-nik


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

-nik

suff.
One associated with or characterized by: beatnik; peacenik.

[Yiddish and Russian (Yiddish, from Russian), of Slavic origin.]

-nik

suffix forming nouns
denoting a person associated with a specified state, belief, or quality: beatnik; refusenik.
[C20: from Russian -nik, as in Sputnik, and influenced by Yiddish -nik (agent suffix)]

-nik

a suffix of nouns that refer, often in a derogatory way, to persons who espouse a cause, represent a cultural attitude, or are ardent enthusiasts of a thing or phenomenon: beatnik; computernik; filmnik; peacenik.
[< Yiddish (compare nudnik) < Slavic: a personal suffix in Slavic languages in contact with Yiddish]
References in periodicals archive ?
In this paper, I concentrate on two suffixes, -ar and -nik; I describe their distribution and try to delimit when one is used rather than the other.
-nik: recnik 'speaker' < recec 'to speak' The suffixes -ar and -er are phonological variants, the latter of which is realized after a palatalized consonant, and they are in complementary distribution.
The starting point of this research focuses on the question of what kind of stem takes -ar/-er, -cer, -eel, -nik, and so on.
-nik: rdlnik 'farmer', reznik 'butcher', pincnik 'waiter', hajnik 'forester', sudnik 'judge' ...
i) why do some verbs take -ar/-er, while others use -nik etc.?
To answer these questions and to show possible explanations for them, this paper focuses specifically on the suffixes -ar and -nik.
In this section, we examine the suffixes -ar/-er and -nik in general.
The suffix -nik, on the other hand, denotes either a person associated with the stem or a thing associated with the stem.
On the other hand, examining semantic motivation, we assume that the morphemes -ar and -nik have a different core meaning, respectively, and that the selection of either -ar or -nik is based on that meaning.
blidar 'carpenter' < blido 'table' (noun) The suffix -nik, on the contrary, is mainly attached to a noun, but words constructed of the root of the (derived) Adjective + -nik also occur.
industrialnik 'industrial person' < industrialny 'industrial' (adjective) < industrija 'industry' (noun) Note that adjective stem of -nik must have always been derived from a noun.
From the point of view of the stem, a verb takes only -ar and an adjective always selects -nik, while a noun takes either -ar or -nik (although -nik is dominant).