-pod


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-pod

or -pode
suff.
Foot; footlike part: pleopod.

[From New Latin -podium (from Greek podion; see podium) and from New Latin -poda, -footed, neuter pl. of -pūs (from Greek -pous, from pous, pod-, foot; see ped- in Indo-European roots).]

-pod

or

-pode

n combining form
indicating a certain type or number of feet: arthropod; tripod.
[from Greek -podos footed, from pous foot]

pod1

(pɒd)

n., v. pod•ded, pod•ding. n.
1. an elongated seed vessel that splits easily along the sides at maturity, as that of the pea or bean.
2. an insect egg case.
3. a streamlined enclosure, housing, or detachable container, esp. on an aircraft or other vehicle.
v.i.
4. to produce pods.
5. to swell out like a pod.
[1680–90; appar. back formation from podder,podware, alter. of codware bagged vegetables =cod husk, bag (compare Old English codd bag and Old Norse koddi pillow, scrotum) + -ware crops, vegetables]
pod′like`, adj.

pod2

(pɒd)

n.
a small herd or school, esp. of seals or whales.
[1825–35, Amer.; perhaps identical with pod1]

pod3

(pɒd)

n.
the straight groove or channel in the body of certain augers or bits.
[1565–75; orig. uncertain; perhaps continuing Old English pād covering, cloak, the socket being thought of as something that conceals (though the phonology is irregular)]

pod-

a combining form meaning “foot”: podiatry.
Also, esp. before a consonant,podo-.
[comb. form representing Greek poús (genitive podós) foot]

-pod

a combining form meaning “one having a foot” of the kind or number specified by the initial element; often corresponding to New Latin class names ending in -poda, with -pod used in English to name a single member of such a class: cephalopod. Compare -ped.
[< New Latin < Greek -pod-, s. of -pous, adj. derivative of poús foot]

POD

port of debarkation.

P.O.D.

1. pay on delivery.
2. Post Office Department.

-pod

A suffix meaning "foot." It is used in the scientific names of the members of many groups of organisms, such as arthropod, an organism having "jointed feet," and sauropod, a dinosaur having "lizard feet."