Miocene

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Mi·o·cene

 (mī′ə-sēn′)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being the epoch of geologic time from about 23 to 5.3 million years ago, the fourth epoch of the Tertiary Period. It is characterized by the spread of grasses and grazing mammals. See Table at geologic time.
n.
The Miocene Epoch.

[Greek meiōn, less; see mei- in Indo-European roots + -cene.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Miocene

(ˈmaɪəˌsiːn)
adj
(Geological Science) of, denoting, or formed in the fourth epoch of the Tertiary period, between the Oligocene and Pliocene epochs, which lasted for 19 million years
n
(Geological Science) the Miocene this epoch or rock series
[C19: from Greek meiōn less + -cene]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Mi•o•cene

(ˈmaɪ əˌsin)
Geol. adj.
1. noting or pertaining to an epoch of the Tertiary Period, occurring from 25 million to 10 million years ago, when grazing mammals became widespread.
n.
2. the Miocene Epoch or Series.
[1832; mio- (< Greek meíōn less) + -cene]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Mi·o·cene

(mī′ə-sēn′)
The fourth epoch of the Tertiary Period, from about 24 to 5 million years ago, characterized by the development of grasses and grazing mammals. See Chart at geologic time.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Pleistocene, Pliocene, Miocene, Oligocene - Pleistocene means "most recent," Pliocene means "more recent," Miocene means "moderately recent," and Oligocence means "but a little recent."
See also related terms for recent.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Miocene - from 25 million to 13 million years agoMiocene - from 25 million to 13 million years ago; appearance of grazing mammals
Tertiary, Tertiary period - from 63 million to 2 million years ago
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Miocene

[ˈmaɪəsiːn]
A. ADJmioceno
B. Nmioceno m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The andesite lava at Budinska Rock is the remnants of the lava cover that poured out from the massive Javorie volcano 13 million years ago alongside volcano fragments, it covered the slopes of the volcano, the TASR newswire reported.Tradition says that bandits used to hide in the cave, the locals linking it with Janosik.
The mother of all citrus plants lived about 13 million years ago, scientists have learned by tracing the maternal side of the citrus family tree.
Washington, May 9 ( ANI ): Researchers have discovered an ancient kitten-sized predator that lived in Bolivia about 13 million years ago - one of the smallest species reported in the extinct order Sparassodonta.
US scientists have collided protons with antiprotons to discover how matter gathered mass after the Big Bang, 13 million years ago.
This one also lived long ago--about 13 million years ago. Native to Southeast Asia, the petite primate, a tarsier (TAR-see-ur), shared a common ancestor with monkeys and humans, if not the dreamy Snow White.
As if the debate over whales and whaling weren't complicated enough, a group of European scientists has published a report on a new whale from the Middle Miocene - about 12 to 13 million years ago - that had 14-inch teeth and apparently ate other whales.
Avian pollination (mainly by hummingbirds) appears to have arisen at least twice about 13 million years ago, at about the time hummingbirds themselves were diversifying; insect-pollinated, relatively small flowers (like those in Brocchinia or Lindmania) were ancestral.