Easter Rising

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Easter Rising

n
(Historical Terms) an armed insurrection in Dublin in 1916 against British rule in Ireland: the insurgents proclaimed the establishment of an independent Irish republic before surrendering, 16 of the leaders later being executed
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The music legend, became tearful when the host presented him with a book of poetry by Joseph Mary-Plunkett connected to the 1916 Rising.
He should remember a talk given by former Irish taoiseach John Bruton on the 100th anniversary of the 1916 rising. It was his opinion that because the Home Rule bill had been passed weeks after World War I was declared in 1914, that devolution was coming, which would, in time, have led to a 32-county republic.
Also on his father's side, Damien learns about the heroics of his great grand-aunt Jenny Shanahan who fought alongside James Connolly in the 1916 Rising.
The interviews offer eyewitness accounts of those who challenged British imperialism in Ireland, describing the 1916 Rising, Bloody Sunday, the Belfast Pograms, and escapes from jail.
This illustrious list included Henry Joy McCracken (1796), Charles Stewart Parnell (1881), Robert Emmet, and the leaders of the 1916 Rising, fourteen of whom were executed in the prison stone-breakers' yard.
Crowley, who works at the Pearse Museum, offers a pictorial history of the life of Patrick Pearse, the leader of the 1916 Rising in Ireland and signatory of the Irish Proclamation of Independence.
"The War Of independence In Kildare" details the group of volunteers who followed the railway track into Dublin to partake in the 1916 rising. He details attacks at Greenhills, Maynooth, and Barrowhouse.
There were scuffles on one of the city's main shopping streets, Henry Street, just off the main thoroughfare O'Connell Street, before republicans laid a wreath at 16 Moore Street - the site where leaders of the 1916 Rising sought refuge and eventually surrendered after the shelling of the GPO.
There were minor scuffles on one of the city's main shopping streets before republicans laid a wreath at 16 Moore Street - the site where leaders of the 1916 Rising sought refuge and eventually surrendered after the shelling of the General Post Office.
The new warning came as thousands of mainstream republicans supporting Sinn Fein and the peace process prepared to hold dozens of commemoration parades throughout Ireland to mark the 1916 Rising.
The area has considerable historic interest, encompassing much of the escape route from the GPO taken by the leaders of the 1916 Rising, and their final headquarters at 16 Moore Street.