Halley's comet

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Hal·ley's comet

 (hăl′ēz, hā′lēz)
n.
A comet with a period of approximately 76 years. The first comet for which a return to the inner solar system was accurately predicted, it last appeared in 1986.

[After Edmund Halley.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Halley's Comet

(ˈhælɪz)
n
(Astronomy) a comet revolving around the sun in a period of about 76 years, last seen in 1985–86
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Hal′ley's com′et

(ˈhæl iz or, often, ˈheɪ liz)
n.
a comet with a period averaging 76 years: most recently visible in 1986.
[after Edmund Halley, who first predicted its return]
pron: The common pronunciation for both the comet and the astronomer Edmund Halley, and the one usu. recommended by astronomers, is (ˈhæl i) However, several spellings of the name, including Hailey and Hawley, were in use during the astronomer's own time, when spellings were not yet fixed, and corresponding pronunciations have survived. The pronunciation (ˈheɪ li) in particular remains associated with Halley's comet; it is less likely to be heard as a pronunciation of Edmund Halley.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Hal·ley's comet

(hăl′ēz, hā′lēz)
A comet that makes one complete orbit around the sun in approximately 76 years. It is visible to the unaided eye and last appeared in 1986.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Halley's comet

A comet that orbits the Sun about every 76 years. It was first recorded in 240 BC, was last seen in 1986, and is next due in 2061.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited