radon

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ra·don

 (rā′dŏn)
n. Symbol Rn
A colorless, radioactive, inert gaseous element that is formed by the radioactive decay of radium and is used to produce neutrons for research. Its most stable isotope is Rn-222 with a half-life of 3.82 days. A natural source of radiation found in most soils and groundwater, radon poses a serious health threat if inhaled. Atomic number 86; melting point -71°C; boiling point -61.7°C; density of gas 9.73 grams per liter; specific gravity (solid) 4. See Periodic Table.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

radon

(ˈreɪdɒn)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a colourless radioactive element of the rare gas group, the most stable isotope of which, radon-222, is a decay product of radium. It is used as an alpha particle source in radiotherapy. Symbol: Rn; atomic no: 86; half-life of 222Rn: 3.82 days; valency: 0; density: 9.73 kg/m3; melting pt: –71°C; boiling pt: –61.7°C
[C20: from radium + -on]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ra•don

(ˈreɪ dɒn)

n.
a chemically inert, radioactive gaseous element produced by the decay of radium: emissions produced by outgassing of rock, brick, etc., are a health hazard. Symbol: Rn; at. no.: 86; at. wt.: 222.
[< German Radon (1918); see radium, -on2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ra·don

(rā′dŏn)
Symbol Rn A colorless, odorless, radioactive element that is a noble gas. It is produced by the radioactive decay of radium and occurs in minute amounts in soil, rocks, and the air near the ground. Radon is used as a source of radiation for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. Its most stable isotope has a half-life of about four days. Atomic number 86. See Periodic Table.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.radon - a radioactive gaseous element formed by the disintegration of radiumradon - a radioactive gaseous element formed by the disintegration of radium; the heaviest of the inert gasses; occurs naturally (especially in areas over granite) and is considered a hazard to health
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
argonon, inert gas, noble gas - any of the chemically inert gaseous elements of the helium group in the periodic table
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
رادون
радон
radon
radon
radono
radoon
radon
radon
radon
radon
ラドン
radon
rádon
radon
radon
radon
радон
radon
radon
радон

radon

[ˈreɪdɒn] N (also radon gas) → radón m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

radon

[ˈreɪdɒn] nradon m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

radon

n (Chem) → Radon nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ra·don

n. radón, elemento radiactivo gaseoso.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

radon

n radón m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The radioactive gases, radon (222Rn), as well as its decay products present in the environment are considered to be the main causes of radiation dosage to the community from radioactive materials.
Determining 222Rn daughter activities by simultaneous alpha- and beta-counting and modeling, Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry 272(1): 69-74.
Inhalation of radon (222Rn) and its radioactive decay products (radon progeny) is associated with increased risk of developing lung cancer (Darby et al., 2005; Krewski et al., 2005).
Prediction of 222Rn in Danish dwellings using geology and house construction information from central databases.
Wu, "Application of 222Rn technique to locate subsurface coal heatings in Australian coal mines," International Journal of Coal Geology, vol.