stereovision

(redirected from 3-D film)
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ster·e·o·vi·sion

 (stĕr′ē-ō-vĭzh′ən, stîr′-)
n.
Visual perception of or exhibition in three dimensions.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

stereovision

(ˈstɛrɪəʊˌvɪʒən; ˈstɪər-)
n
(General Physics) the perception or exhibition of three-dimensional objects in three dimensions
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
With two teardrop-shaped, light-filtering lenses perched on their heads, the insects lashed out in lab experiments at images of tempting prey in a special 3-D film, a team of scientists said.
Like Let Your Light Shine, Alexandre Larose's Brouillard--Passage #14 (2013) pushes the limits of what might properly be considered a 3-D film in provocative and productive ways.
Audiences will be able to see a film shot in 1953 in 3-D for the first time October 14, when the 3-D Film Archive releases “Dragonfly Squadron,” the company's first 3-D Blu-ray, distributed through Olive Films.
Despite a recent uptick in scholarship on 3-D, most historians have completely omitted the significance of Robert Rodriguez's Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over (2003), the first major theatrically-released 3-D film in almost twenty years, as a noteworthy turning point in the history of stereoscopic cinema.
6 The World 3-D Film Expo will return to the Egyptian Theater, paying tribute to the 60th anniversary of what many film historians regard as the Golden Age of 3D.
The tendency to approach 3-D film as a novelty used to draw audiences to the cinema with the promise of an unfamiliar (if not entirely new) optical experience has led to 3-D's peculiar historicization: the history of 3-D is constructed as a series of short-lived, unsustainable "crazes" that mark the decline and rise of the film industry and its profitability.
However, this summer's sagging numbers for 3-D theaters suggest that audiences have either cooled on the format or that they are less willing to shell out the additional cost of seeing a 3-D film, which can (http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/entertainmentnewsbuzz/2011/01/movie-ticket-prices-reach-new-milestone.html) boost a ticket price by up to $4.
"Dark of the Moon" also introduces a whole new dimension as Bay's first 3-D film. Though he didn't initially embrace the technology, the film lent itself to 3-D "because just the size differential between robots and humans," the director said.
Way back in the 1920s, US cinematographer Robert F Elder rolled out the first 3-D film to a commercial audience using a system he designed.
And this is just the trailer for an upcoming digital 3-D film starring Johnny Depp as the Mad Hatter.
Movie-lovers will be treated to an advanced showing at Silverlink as the 3-D film rolls out a week before the standard version.
"Monster House" isn't the only new 3-D film. A slate of movies that jump off the screen are coming to a theater near you, including the recently opened animated feature "The Ant Bully," which is being offered in 3-D at some IMAX theaters.