401


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401(k)

 (fôr′ō-wŭn-kā′)
n.
A retirement investment plan that allows an employee to put a percentage of earned wages into a tax-deferred investment account selected by the employer. Also called salary reduction plan.

401(k)

(ˈfɔrˌoʊˈwʌnˈkeɪ, ˈfoʊr-)
n.
a savings plan that allows employees to contribute a fixed amount of income to a retirement account.
References in classic literature ?
If you turn back to page 401 you can compare this with Milton's own version.
The entire balance in Dave's 401(K) can be rolled over, but Dave receives only 80% of that amount ($120,000), because the distribution from the 401 (k) was subject to withholding.
However, in the case of a direct rollover from one Roth 401 (k) plan to another, the five-year period of participation for the receiving plan would begin on the first day of the employee's tax year for which he or she made designated Roth contributions to the transferring or receiving plan, whichever is earlier.
Invest up to the maximum allowed in a 401 (k) or 403(b), For additional higher education costs, invest in any state's section 529 college savings plan and/or a Coverdell account.
Even though our agents are considered independent contractors, through benefit programs such as the 401 (a) plan, we.
5 million workers will participate in approximately 310,000 401 (k) plans with total assets of $1 trillion.
Helping participants become investors will be the primary purpose of the next generation of defined-contribution products, particularly 401 (k) plans.
Your goal is to make an effective, high-impact presentation so they'll buy into your 401 (k) plan.
The proposed SOP, titled Accounting for and Reporting of 401(h) Features of Defined Benefit Pension Plans, says 401 (h) funds are assets of the defined benefit plan but also are a liability owed to the health and welfare plan.
Instead, as he and other experts will tell you, it's best to funnel: the majority of your retirement savings into well-diversified mutual funds offered in your 401 (k), thereby ensuring yourself a cushion when the markets have their rough days.
The Wall Street Journal article, "Value of Unused Vacation Days Can Now Be Added to 401 (k)s" (12/10/96), based on Letter Ruling (TAM) 9635002, has generated a great deal of interest on the concept of converting vacation days into qualified retirement plan contributions.