WPA

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WPA

abbr.
Work Projects Administration

WPA

(in the US) abbreviation for
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) Work Projects Administration or Works Progress Administration

WPA

Work Projects Administration; (earlier) Works Progress Administration.

WPA

The WPA, or Works Project Administration, was started by the U.S. Government in 1935 as a program for economic relief during the Depression years.
References in periodicals archive ?
In effect, to enhance the wireless network security against new and continuous proved attacks, IEEE 802.11i developed three protocols: WEP, TKIP and CCMP.
They comply with the latest 802.11i Wi-Fi security standard and support Bluetooth Secure Connections.
The other generation of Wi-Fi technology are as IEEE 802.11b, 802.11a, 802.11g, 802.11n and 802.11i. These are the enhanced version of Wi-Fi technology operate on 2.4GHZ and 5.8 GHz frequency channel.
NIST recommends that organizations with existing legacy IEEE 802.11 implementations develop and implement migration strategies to move to IEEE 802.11i based security because of its superior capabilities.
The IEEE 802.11s [2] defines the security of WMNs that are still using the IEEE 802.11i [3] standards with IEEE 802.11x [4] and 4-way handshake protocols.
Robust Security: ORiNOCO AP-9100 products support IEEE 802.11i, that provides AES-128 encryption and mutual authentication based on IEEE 802.1x, ensuring the highest level of security for an enterprise.
The module provides secure 802.11i and 128-bit AES Encryption and operates securely in the 2.4 GHz or 5 GHz bands.
The ability to "lock down" mobile computers and avoid data theft if the device is stolen or lost; use integrated security firewalls and authentication and encryption; and confidently rely on enterprise wireless networks, such as the popular 802.11i option, are all of concern for those moving into the wireless world.
Being able to "lock down" mobile computers and avoid data theft if the device is stolen or lost; use integrated security firewalls and authentication and encryption; and confidently rely on enterprise wireless networks, such as the popular 802.11i option, are all of concern for shippers moving into the wireless world.