A level

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A level

n. Chiefly British
The later of two standardized tests in a secondary school subject, used as a qualification for entrance into a university.

[A(dvanced) level.]

A′-lev′el adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

A level

(in Britain) n
1. (Education)
a. a public examination in a subject taken for the General Certificate of Education (GCE), usually at the age of 17–18
b. the course leading to this examination
c. (as modifier): A-level maths.
2. (Education) a pass in a particular subject at A level: she has three A levels.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

A lev•el

(ˈeɪ ˌlɛv əl)
n.
a British school examination taken at the end of secondary school.
[1950–55; A(dvanced)level]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.A level - the advanced level of a subject taken in school (usually two years after O level)A level - the advanced level of a subject taken in school (usually two years after O level)
England - a division of the United Kingdom
tier, grade, level - a relative position or degree of value in a graded group; "lumber of the highest grade"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مُسْتَوى مُتَقَدِّم
fx studentereksamen
emelt szintû érettségi
záverečná skúška na strednej škole

A level

n (Brit) → Abschluss mder Sekundarstufe 2; to take one’s A levels˜ das Abitur machen; 3 A levels˜ das Abitur in 3 Fächern
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

A level

(ˈei ˌlevəl) noun
(abbreviation) Advanced Level; (in Britain) an examination in a particular subject that pupils have to pass if they want to go to university; the level of these examinations. I failed my Chemistry A level; What subjects are you taking at A level?
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the past decade A-level entries have gone up, but there has been a decrease in subjects like physics, modern foreign languages and maths and a growth in media studies, sports science, expressive arts, religious studies and psychology.
THE exams watchdog called for a review of A-level maths today after controversial reforms were found to have made the subject "easier".
MORE than 12,000 Welsh A-level students may have had their A-level papers incorrectly marked, it emerged yesterday.
This summer A-level entries dived 12.6% from 38,480 in 2015 to 33,640.
The borough became just one of three areas in the country without any A-Level providers in September, after the closure of its last sixth form at Halewood Academy.
The report said coastal towns and rural areas "fare particularly poorly" with A-level provision, and pointed out that in most areas with low A-level take-up, the surrounding local authorities also had below average levels of provision.
I READ with interest the article on the decline in Welsh schools in the number of students taking A-level in European Modern Languages between 2005 to 2014.
THE proportion of students receiving the top grade at A-level has increased slightly here.
England's exams regulator is to look into the grading of last summer's maths A-level.
| A-level results in Wales are up at A* and A and stable at A-E; | AS results have fallen slightly at A and remain stable at A-E At A-level, in comparison with 2018 results: | The percentage achieving an A* is 9.1%, up from 8.7%; | The percentage achieving grades A* or A is 27%, up from 26.3%; | The percentage achieving A* to E is 97.6%, up from 97.4%; | There were 31,483 A-level entries this year in Wales compared to 33,640 in 2018.
Carmel student Raphael Ardani achieved an A* and three A grades at A-Level and is set to take up a place University College London to study civil engineering.
The figures, published by the Joint Council for Qualifications (JCQ), cover A-level entries from students in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.