rectifier

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rec·ti·fi·er

 (rĕk′tə-fī′ər)
n.
1. One that rectifies: a rectifier of many wrongs.
2. Electronics A device, such as a diode, that converts alternating current to direct current.
3. A worker who blends or dilutes whiskey or other alcoholic beverages.

rectifier

(ˈrɛktɪˌfaɪə)
n
1. (Electronics) an electronic device, such as a semiconductor diode or valve, that converts an alternating current to a direct current by suppression or inversion of alternate half-cycles
2. (Chemistry) chem an apparatus for condensing a hot vapour to a liquid in distillation; condenser
3. a thing or person that rectifies

rec•ti•fi•er

(ˈrɛk təˌfaɪ ər)

n.
1. a person or thing that rectifies.
2. an electrical apparatus for changing an alternating current into a direct current.

rectifier

A device for converting alternating current into direct current. See also inverter.

rectifier

An electrical device that converts alternating current into direct current.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rectifier - electrical device that transforms alternating into direct currentrectifier - electrical device that transforms alternating into direct current
demodulator, detector - rectifier that extracts modulation from a radio carrier wave
electrical device - a device that produces or is powered by electricity
full-wave rectifier - rectifier that converts the negative half wave of an alternating current into a positive half wave
2.rectifier - a person who corrects or sets right; "a rectifier of prejudices"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Translations

rectifier

[ˈrektɪfaɪəʳ] N (Elec, Chem etc) → rectificador m (Mech) → rectificadora f

rectifier

n (Elec) → Gleichrichter m

rectifier

[ˈrɛktɪˌfaɪəʳ] n (Elec) → raddrizzatore m
References in periodicals archive ?
The AC to DC conversion losses using this circuit have been demonstrated to be a fraction of the conversion losses experienced when using other more established rectifier based technologies.
Conventional power converter systems using an inverter have close to 10% power conversion loss during the AC to DC conversion and the subsequent DC to AC conversion.
However, from the implementation perspective, internal power management involves AC to DC conversion at the input.