abolition

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Related to Abolition movement: abolitionism, abolitionist

ab·o·li·tion

 (ăb′ə-lĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The act of doing away with or the state of being done away with; annulment.
2. Abolishment of slavery.

[Latin abolitiō, abolitiōn-, from abolitus, past participle of abolēre, to abolish; see abolish.]

ab′o·li′tion·ar′y (-lĭsh′ə-nĕr′ē) adj.

abolition

(ˌæbəˈlɪʃən)
n
1. the act of abolishing or the state of being abolished; annulment
2. (Historical Terms) (often capital) (in British territories) the ending of the slave trade (1807) or the ending of slavery (1833): accomplished after a long campaign led by William Wilberforce
3. (Historical Terms) (often capital) (in the US) the emancipation of the slaves, accomplished by the Emancipation Proclamation issued in 1863 and ratified in 1865
[C16: from Latin abolitio, from abolēre to destroy]
ˌaboˈlitionary adj
ˌaboˈlitionism n
ˌaboˈlitionist n, adj

ab•o•li•tion

(ˌæb əˈlɪʃ ən)

n.
1. the act of abolishing or the state of being abolished.
2. (sometimes cap.) the legal termination of slavery in the U.S.
[1520–30; < Latin abolitiō=aboli-, variant s. of abolēre to efface, destroy (compare abolish) + -tiō -tion]
ab`o•li′tion•ar′y, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abolition - the act of abolishing a system or practice or institution (especially abolishing slavery)abolition - the act of abolishing a system or practice or institution (especially abolishing slavery); "the abolition of capital punishment"
ending, termination, conclusion - the act of ending something; "the termination of the agreement"

abolition

abolition

noun
Translations
إِلْغاءإلغَاء، إبْطَال
zrušeníodstranění
afskaffelseophævelse
kumoaminenlakkauttaminenlakkautusmitätöinti
abolicijaukinuće
eltörlés
afnám
廃止
폐지
odprava
avskaffande
การล้มเลิก
sự hủy bỏ

abolition

[ˌæbəʊˈlɪʃən] Nabolición f, supresión f

abolition

[ˌæbəˈlɪʃən] n [death penalty, slavery, capital punishment, the monarchy] → abolition f; [fees, tax] → abolition f
the abolition of slavery → l'abolition de l'esclavage

abolition

[æbəʊˈlɪʃn] nabolizione f

abolish

(əˈboliʃ) verb
to put an end to (a custom, law etc). We must abolish the death penalty.
ˌaboˈlition (ӕ-) noun

abolition

إِلْغاء zrušení afskaffelse Abschaffung κατάργηση abolición lakkautus abolition ukinuće abolizione 廃止 폐지 afschaffing avskaffelse zniesienie abolição отмена avskaffande การล้มเลิก yürürlükten kaldırma sự hủy bỏ 废除
References in periodicals archive ?
It was a hot topic at the same time as feminism and the abolition movement, and Faulkner discusses fascinating intersections between marriage reform, women's rights, and the push to end slavery.
The book wears its learning lightly but reaches into the reader's heart as it ponders questions involving science, the relationships between fathers (or father figures) and sons against a backdrop of slavery and the abolition movement. The first half of the book is more memorable and shocking than the second, which focuses on how difficult it can be to leave the past behind.
Frederick Douglass was more sensible than the Garrisonians, not only in constitutional interpretation but also in his prudential understanding that the abolition movement needed the Constitution and the American Founding in order to succeed.
It will also investigate the intertwined histories of the abolition movement, President Lincoln's role in emancipation, and the Women's Suffrage movement.
They introduced this heinous law and should, therefore, come out to condemn it and support the abolition movement.
But he perceives the global abolition movement that the church has joined is a tool that can unite the majority of nations in the world that do not possess nuclear weapons, reminding them of their moral and existential stake in a future free of nuclear weapons and their obligation to rally against powers that continue to possess them.
Eighty-Eight Years tracks and compares the abolition movement in the United States to developments in other parts of the New World to understand better why the demise of slavery took longer and was more difficult in the United States than elsewhere.
He toured Britain, giving speeches in support of the slavery abolition movement at venues like the Nelson Street music hall in Newcastle - one of many venues for his appearances in the region.
The author has given us a book about the abolition movement that does not minimize the cultural or historical role of Douglass.
He traces the death penalty from the dark ages through the Enlightenment, the abolition movement, the machinery of death, the US Supreme Court, the law and its evolution, lawful versus unlawful sanctions, the death penalty as torture, and a jus cogens norm.