abolition

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Related to Abolition movement: abolitionism, abolitionist

ab·o·li·tion

 (ăb′ə-lĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The act of doing away with or the state of being done away with; annulment.
2. Abolishment of slavery.

[Latin abolitiō, abolitiōn-, from abolitus, past participle of abolēre, to abolish; see abolish.]

ab′o·li′tion·ar′y (-lĭsh′ə-nĕr′ē) adj.

abolition

(ˌæbəˈlɪʃən)
n
1. the act of abolishing or the state of being abolished; annulment
2. (Historical Terms) (often capital) (in British territories) the ending of the slave trade (1807) or the ending of slavery (1833): accomplished after a long campaign led by William Wilberforce
3. (Historical Terms) (often capital) (in the US) the emancipation of the slaves, accomplished by the Emancipation Proclamation issued in 1863 and ratified in 1865
[C16: from Latin abolitio, from abolēre to destroy]
ˌaboˈlitionary adj
ˌaboˈlitionism n
ˌaboˈlitionist n, adj

ab•o•li•tion

(ˌæb əˈlɪʃ ən)

n.
1. the act of abolishing or the state of being abolished.
2. (sometimes cap.) the legal termination of slavery in the U.S.
[1520–30; < Latin abolitiō=aboli-, variant s. of abolēre to efface, destroy (compare abolish) + -tiō -tion]
ab`o•li′tion•ar′y, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abolition - the act of abolishing a system or practice or institution (especially abolishing slavery)abolition - the act of abolishing a system or practice or institution (especially abolishing slavery); "the abolition of capital punishment"
ending, termination, conclusion - the act of ending something; "the termination of the agreement"

abolition

abolition

noun
Translations
إِلْغاءإلغَاء، إبْطَال
zrušeníodstranění
afskaffelseophævelse
kumoaminenlakkauttaminenlakkautusmitätöinti
abolicijaukinuće
eltörlés
afnám
廃止
폐지
odprava
avskaffande
การล้มเลิก
sự hủy bỏ

abolition

[ˌæbəʊˈlɪʃən] Nabolición f, supresión f

abolition

[ˌæbəˈlɪʃən] n [death penalty, slavery, capital punishment, the monarchy] → abolition f; [fees, tax] → abolition f
the abolition of slavery → l'abolition de l'esclavage

abolition

[æbəʊˈlɪʃn] nabolizione f

abolish

(əˈboliʃ) verb
to put an end to (a custom, law etc). We must abolish the death penalty.
ˌaboˈlition (ӕ-) noun

abolition

إِلْغاء zrušení afskaffelse Abschaffung κατάργηση abolición lakkautus abolition ukinuće abolizione 廃止 폐지 afschaffing avskaffelse zniesienie abolição отмена avskaffande การล้มเลิก yürürlükten kaldırma sự hủy bỏ 废除
References in periodicals archive ?
He toured Britain, giving speeches in support of the slavery abolition movement at venues like the Nelson Street music hall in Newcastle - one of many venues for his appearances in the region.
This group of women I lived with in prison are all active today in the prison abolition movement.
The author has given us a book about the abolition movement that does not minimize the cultural or historical role of Douglass.
He traces the death penalty from the dark ages through the Enlightenment, the abolition movement, the machinery of death, the US Supreme Court, the law and its evolution, lawful versus unlawful sanctions, the death penalty as torture, and a jus cogens norm.
Black History walks take participants on a historical journey through Glasgow's mercantile past and examine the city's connections with tobacco, slavery and the abolition movement.
But I most anticipate reading Manisha Sinha's The Slave's Cause: A History of Abolition (Yale University Press) to learn of the African American role in shaping the abolition movement and to "hear" voices once lost in history's silences.
His support of the abolition movement very likely cost him the presidential election on four occasions.
The documents trace the evolution from feminist comparisons between women's subordination and slaves' lives to the emergence of the abolition movement, the first political movement to bring together women from different nationalities and races.
In the days and quite possibly years ahead, the abolition movement in Mauritania may very well be without its iconic leaders or much of any global visibility.
He described the abolition movement as "weak, powerless and soon to be forgotten'' and referred to white men from the South as "the chivalrous race.
As he notes, "this book ends at the point where most studies of the abolition movement begin" (217).
This has put Lebanon in the crosshairs of the International Commission against the Death Penalty, which paid a visit to promote the abolition movement earlier this month.