abomination

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a·bom·i·na·tion

 (ə-bŏm′ə-nā′shən)
n.
1. Abhorrence; disgust.
2. A cause of abhorrence or disgust.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

abomination

(əˌbɒmɪˈneɪʃən)
n
1. a person or thing that is disgusting
2. an action that is vicious, vile, etc
3. intense loathing
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•bom•i•na•tion

(əˌbɒm əˈneɪ ʃən)

n.
1. something greatly disliked or abhorred.
2. intense aversion or loathing; detestation.
3. a vile or shameful action, condition, or habit.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abomination - a person who is loathsome or disgustingabomination - a person who is loathsome or disgusting
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
2.abomination - hate coupled with disgustabomination - hate coupled with disgust    
disgust - strong feelings of dislike
hate, hatred - the emotion of intense dislike; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action
3.abomination - an action that is vicious or vileabomination - an action that is vicious or vile; an action that arouses disgust or abhorrence; "his treatment of the children is an abomination"
evildoing, transgression - the act of transgressing; the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle; "the boy was punished for the transgressions of his father"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

abomination

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

abomination

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
شَيءٌ بَغيضْ
hnusodporodpornostohavnostzhnusení
modbydelighedvederstyggelighed
viîbjóîur
hnusodpor
iğrenmetiksinti

abomination

[əˌbɒmɪˈneɪʃən] N
1. (= feeling) → aversión f
2. (= detestable act, thing) → escándalo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

abomination

[əˌbɒmɪˈneɪʃən] n
(= outrage) → abomination f
(= hatred) → abomination f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

abomination

n
no plVerabscheuung f; to be held in abomination by somebodyvon jdm verabscheut werden
(= loathsome act)Abscheulichkeit f; (= loathsome thing)Scheußlichkeit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

abomination

[əˌbɒmɪˈneɪʃn] n (feeling) → avversione f, disgusto; (detestable act, thing) → azione f (or cosa) orrenda
to hold sth in abomination → detestare qc
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

abominate

(əˈbomineit) verb
to detest. He abominates cruelty.
aˌbomiˈnation noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The light proceeding from one of these gaudy abominations is unequal broken, and painful.
Though it was faint and low, it moved me more profoundly than all that I had hitherto heard of the abominations behind the wall.
What her answer really said was: "If you lift a finger you'll drive me back: back to all the abominations you know of, and all the temptations you half guess." He understood it as clearly as if she had uttered the words, and the thought kept him anchored to his side of the table in a kind of moved and sacred submission.
Do you think I wanted to go forth amongst those abominations? it's that poor sinful Rita that wouldn't let me be where I was, serving a holy man, next door to a church, and sure of my share of Paradise.
As I thought of that, I was almost moved to begin a massacre of the helpless abominations about me, but I contained myself.
But the figure which most attracted the public eye, and stirred up the deepest feeling, was the Episcopal clergyman of King's Chapel, riding haughtily among the magistrates in his priestly vestments, the fitting representatives of prelacy and persecution, the union of church and state, and all those abominations which had driven the Puritans to the wilderness.
"I only brought them to try, for Rose is growing stout, and will have no figure if it is not attended to soon," she added, with an air of calm conviction that roused the Doctor still more, for this was one of his especial abominations.
Judaea now and all the Promised Land, Reduced a province under Roman yoke, Obeys Tiberius, nor is always ruled With temperate sway: oft have they violated The Temple, oft the Law, with foul affronts, Abominations rather, as did once Antiochus.
Such an idol as that found in the secret groves of Queen Maachah in Judea; and for worshipping which, king Asa, her son, did depose her, and destroyed the idol, and burnt it for an abomination at the brook Kedron, as darkly set forth in the 15th chapter of the first book of Kings.
That is to say, persuaded that I should never do any good with my life, and that I was inferior even to the sole of my own boot, I took it into my head that it was absurd for me to aspire at all-- rather, that I ought to account myself a disgrace and an abomination. Once a man has lost his self-respect, and has decided to abjure his better qualities and human dignity, he falls headlong, and cannot choose but do so.
"This pretended foundling is a real monster of abomination," resumed Jehanne.
A clock, in a splintered and battered oblong box of varnished wood, she suddenly regarded as an abomination. She noted that it ticked raspingly.