abrasion

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a·bra·sion

 (ə-brā′zhən)
n.
1. The process of wearing down or rubbing away by means of friction.
2.
a. A scraped or worn area.
b. A scraped area on the skin or on a mucous membrane, resulting from injury or irritation.

[Medieval Latin abrāsiō, abrāsiōn-, from Latin abrāsus, past participle of abrādere, to scrape off; see abrade.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

abrasion

(əˈbreɪʒən)
n
1. the process of scraping or wearing down by friction
2. a scraped area or spot; graze
3. (Physical Geography) geography the effect of mechanical erosion of rock, esp a river bed, by rock fragments scratching and scraping it; wearing down. Compare attrition4, corrasion
[C17: from Medieval Latin abrāsiōn-, from the past participle of Latin abrādere to abrade]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•bra•sion

(əˈbreɪ ʒən)

n.
1. a scraped spot or area; the result of rubbing or abrading: abrasions on his leg.
2. the act or process of abrading.
[1650–60; < Medieval Latin abrāsiō < Latin abrād(ere) (see abrade)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ab·ra·sion

(ə-brā′zhən)
1. The process of wearing away or rubbing down by means of friction.
2. A scraped area on the skin.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

abrasion

In photography, a scratch or mark produced mechanically on an emulsion surface or film base.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abrasion - an abraded area where the skin is torn or worn offabrasion - an abraded area where the skin is torn or worn off
graze - a superficial abrasion
rope burn - abrasion (usually on the hands) caused by friction from a rope
wound, lesion - an injury to living tissue (especially an injury involving a cut or break in the skin)
2.abrasion - erosion by frictionabrasion - erosion by friction      
eating away, eroding, erosion, wearing, wearing away - (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)
3.abrasion - the wearing down of rock particles by friction due to water or wind or iceabrasion - the wearing down of rock particles by friction due to water or wind or ice
rubbing, friction - the resistance encountered when one body is moved in contact with another
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

abrasion

noun
1. (Medical) graze, scratch, trauma (Pathology), scrape, scuff, chafe, surface injury He had severe abrasions to his right cheek.
2. rubbing, wear, scratching, scraping, grating, friction, scouring, attrition, corrosion, wearing down, erosion, scuffing, chafing, grinding down, wearing away, abrading The sole of the shoe should be designed to take constant abrasion.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
كَشْط ، خَدْش، حَكْ
абразия
odřenina
hudafskrabning
hiertymähiomapölyhiontakuluma
abrasionécorchuresurcreusement
skráma
abrazyvinisįdrėskimasnubrozdinimasšvitras
noberzumsnobrāzums

abrasion

[əˈbreɪʒən] N (= act, injury) → abrasión f, escoriación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

abrasion

[əˈbreɪʒən] n
(on skin)écorchure f
(= friction) [metal, stone etc surfaces] → abrasion f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

abrasion

n (Med) → (Haut)abschürfung f; (Geol) → Abtragung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

abrasion

[əˈbreɪʒn] nabrasione f; (injury) → escoriazione f, abrasione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

abrasion

(əˈbreiʒən) noun
an injury caused by scraping or grazing the skin. minor abrasions.
aˈbrasive (-siv) adjective
tending to make surfaces rough when rubbed on to them. An abrasive material is unsuitable for cleaning baths.
noun
something used for scraping or rubbing a surface. Sandpaper is an abrasive.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

a·bra·sion

n. abrasión, excoriación, irritación o raspadura de las mucosas o de una superficie a causa de una fricción o de un trauma;
___ collarcírculo de ___, marca circular de pólvora que deja en la piel el disparo de un arma de fuego.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

abrasion

n abrasión f (form), raspadura
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
She noticed that the hand he waved was covered with fresh abrasions, in the process of healing, and a glance at the other loose-hanging hand showed it to be in the same condition.
The sudden arrest of his motion, the abrasion of one of his hands on the gravel, restored him, and he wept with delight.
The ring-finger had suffered a slight abrasion, and the stain of the blood was still visible and unchanged after forty-one years.
At other places the banks were banded with great veins of iron ore, laid bare by the abrasion of the river.
Locking the cow's head in an iron stanchion, he had shed his coat, rolled up his right sleeve almost to the shoulder, washed his hand and arm in a solution of carbolic and hot water, carefully examining them to make sure there was no abrasion of any kind.
Nowhere upon any of them was the sign of mortal wound, nor even slightest scratch or abrasion.
It is true that fever and dysentery are perpetually on the walk-about, that loathsome skin diseases abound, that the air is saturated with a poison that bites into every pore, cut, or abrasion and plants malignant ulcers, and that many strong men who escape dying there return as wrecks to their own countries.
As long as the criminal remains upon two legs so long must there be some indentation, some abrasion, some trifling displacement which can be detected by the scientific searcher.
An Indian study regarding abrasion related tooth surface loss was conducted to associate tooth brushing behaviors and hard tissue abrasion among population residing in Shimla city.18 The investigators concluded insignificant linkage among variables of type of tooth brush used, brushing technique and dental abrasions which is quite similar to our results.
[2] Corneal abrasions result from a disruption or loss of cells in the top layer of cornea called the corneal epithelium.
Similarly, forceful slaps produce a negative imprint, human kicks generate a shoe imprint, and motor vehicle tire treads induce polygonal abrasions or patterned contusions.
Harold Jackson reported in a study of patients with corneal abrasions published in 1960 that there was no difference in healing between eyes that were patched and eyes that were left unpatched.