absence seizure

(redirected from Absence epilepsy)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

absence seizure

n.
A generalized seizure marked by transient loss of consciousness and the absence of convulsions, occurring mostly in children. Also called petit mal seizure.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.absence seizure - the occurrence of an abrupt, transient loss or impairment of consciousness (which is not subsequently remembered), sometimes with light twitching, fluttering eyelids, etc.absence seizure - the occurrence of an abrupt, transient loss or impairment of consciousness (which is not subsequently remembered), sometimes with light twitching, fluttering eyelids, etc.; common in petit mal epilepsy
ictus, raptus, seizure - a sudden occurrence (or recurrence) of a disease; "he suffered an epileptic seizure"
epilepsia minor, petit mal, petit mal epilepsy - epilepsy characterized by paroxysmal attacks of brief clouding of consciousness (and possibly other abnormalities); "she has been suffering from petit mal since childhood"
complex absence - an absence seizure accompanied by other abnormalities (atonia or automatisms or vasomotor changes)
pure absence, simple absence - an absence seizure without other complications; followed by 3-per-sec brainwave spikes
subclinical absence - a transient impairment of cortical function demonstrable only by 3-per-second brainwave spikes
References in periodicals archive ?
Childhood Absence Epilepsy (CAE) is thought to be a general form of epilepsy which is believed to affect the entire brain (Chen, Lu, Pan, Zhang, Wu, Xu & Ding, 2003).
Aphasic status in Landau-Kleffner syndrome, absence status in juvenile absence epilepsy, NCSE in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and de novo (sometimes recurring) absence status of elderly are other entities listed deserving special attention (2,3).
Liwsi Mo Hoyland, a pupil at Ysgol Abercaseg, Bethesda, was just five years old when diagnosed with Atypical Absence Epilepsy last year.
She was diagnosed with juvenile absence epilepsy at the age of nine.
Some authors consider cases of childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) developing to JME to be subtypes of JME with a different outcome [2].
Patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy tend to have similar or better quality of life scores in adulthood in comparison with patients with absence epilepsy except when there are comorbid psychiatric conditions, according to findings from a case-control study.
Other generalized epilepsy syndromes include childhood absence epilepsy, juvenile absence epilepsy, and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME)--all idiopathic with a probable genetic predisposition.
Side effects- rare cognitive issues, may worsen myoclonic and absence epilepsy, MRI changes in deep gray and white matter, usually transient and asymptomatic, weight gain, fatigue, somnolence, irritability, behavioral changes, psychosis, depression, ataxia; hyperactivity and agitation in children
Paroxysmal tonic upgaze of childhood with co-existent absence epilepsy.
9) Recurrence risk is lowest in children with childhood absence epilepsy and benign focal epilepsy of childhood and highest in those with symptomatic seizures or history of Todd's paresis following seizures.