absolute value

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absolute value

n.
1. The numerical value of a real number without regard to its sign. For example, the absolute value of -4 (written │-4│) is 4. Also called numerical value.
2. The modulus of a complex number, equal to the square root of the sum of the squares of the real and imaginary components of the number.

absolute value

n
1. (Mathematics) the positive real number equal to a given real but disregarding its sign. Written | x |. Where r is positive, | r | = r = | –r |
2. (Mathematics) Also called: modulus a measure of the magnitude of a complex number, represented by the length of a line in the Argand diagram: |x + iy | = √(x2 + y2), so | 4 + 3i | = 5

ab′solute val′ue


n.
1. the magnitude of a quantity, irrespective of sign; the distance of a quantity from zero. The absolute value of a number is symbolized by two vertical lines, as |3| or |−3| is three.
2. the square root of the sum of the squares of the real and imaginary parts of a given complex number. Also called modulus.
[1905–10]

absolute value

The value of a number without regard to its sign. For example, the absolute value of +3 (written │+3│) and the absolute value of -3 (written │-3│) are both 3.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.absolute value - a real number regardless of its signabsolute value - a real number regardless of its sign
definite quantity - a specific measure of amount
modulus - the absolute value of a complex number
References in classic literature ?
There was only one thing that had an absolute value for each individual, and it was just that original impulse, that internal heat, that feeling of one's self in one's own breast.
One may almost doubt if the wisest man has learned anything of absolute value by living.
In the analysis, the values can be applied either in [[OHM]] and [F], or in [[OHM] x m] and [F/m], since using the specific values in expression (2) instead of absolute values, l and S are shortened, and the result remains the former.
In this article, we will discuss the numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of sums of absolute values of linear functions.
We call a graph G = (V, E) (n, d, [lambda])-graph if G is a d-regular graph on n vertices with the absolute values of each of its eigenvalues but the largest one are at most [lambda].