absolute monarchy


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absolute monarchy

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a monarchy without constitutional limits. Compare constitutional monarchy
References in classic literature ?
An absolute monarchy is one in which the sovereign does as he pleases so long as he pleases the assassins.
An oppressed class under the sway of the feudal nobility, an armed and self-governing association in the mediaeval commune; here independent urban republic (as in Italy and Germany), there taxable "third estate" of the monarchy (as in France), afterwards, in the period of manufacture proper, serving either the semi-feudal or the absolute monarchy as a counterpoise against the nobility, and, in fact, corner-stone of the great monarchies in general, the bourgeoisie has at last, since the establishment of Modern Industry and of the world-market, conquered for itself, in the modern representative State, exclusive political sway.
At this stage, therefore, the proletarians do not fight their enemies, but the enemies of their enemies, the remnants of absolute monarchy, the landowners, the non-industrial bourgeois, the petty bourgeoisie.
In reality, I know but of one solid objection to absolute monarchy. The only defect in which excellent constitution seems to be, the difficulty of finding any man adequate to the office of an absolute monarch: for this indispensably requires three qualities very difficult, as it appears from history, to be found in princely natures: first, a sufficient quantity of moderation in the prince, to be contented with all the power which is possible for him to have.
We abolished absolute monarchy quietly by an Act of Parliament in 1689, one hundred years before the French achieved the same in a sea of blood.
The absolute monarchy has ramped up its efforts to crush dissent in recent years, arresting and executing hundreds of activists, many of whom are Shiite Muslims, women or associates of the Muslim Brotherhood, all groups considered by Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman as threats to the carefully curated order of the Saudi state and its official religion of Wahhabist Sunni Islam.
This is considered a historical move in the country's politics as the candidacy of a close member of the royal family is unprecedented in Thailand since the era of absolute monarchy ended 86 years ago.
The kingdom is an absolute monarchy while the North African country has undergone a democratic transition since 2011.
Which king began England's move away from absolute monarchy by signing the Magna Carta?
CARDINAL JOHN HEENAN, who was archbishop of Westminster at the time of Humanae Vitae, wrote afterwards that Vatican II had left the church with the papacy as an absolute monarchy. The Council had swept away the Vatican Curia's constraints on papal power, but had not replaced these with a truly collegial form of governance in which the bishops represented the people of their dioceses.
The ultraconservative kingdom, an absolute monarchy, has introduced a string of reform in past months, spearheaded by the country's unchallenged Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, dubbed "MBS", who was appointed heir to the throne in June 2017.
Add to that the lack of any political reforms in his domestic agenda and in many ways the new Saudi Arabia could very much come to resemble the old Saudi Arabia: an absolute monarchy with concessions to preferred sections of society.