abstraction

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ab·strac·tion

 (ăb-străk′shən, əb-)
n.
1.
a. The act of abstracting or the state of having been abstracted.
b. An abstract concept, idea, or term.
c. An abstract quality.
2. Preoccupation; absent-mindedness.
3. An abstract work of art.

ab·strac′tion·al, ab·strac′tive adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

abstraction

(æbˈstrækʃən)
n
1. absence of mind; preoccupation
2. the process of formulating generalized ideas or concepts by extracting common qualities from specific examples
3. an idea or concept formulated in this way: good and evil are abstractions.
4. (Logic) logic an operator that forms a class name or predicate from any given expression. See also lambda calculus
5. (Art Terms) an abstract painting, sculpture, etc
6. the act of withdrawing or removing
abˈstractive adj
abˈstractively adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ab•strac•tion

(æbˈstræk ʃən)

n.
1. an abstract or general idea or term.
2. the act of considering something in terms of general qualities, apart from concrete realities, specific objects, or actual instances.
3. absent-mindedness; inattention.
4. the quality of being abstract.
[1540–50; < Late Latin]
ab•strac′tion•al, adj.
ab•strac′tive, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

abstraction

the taking of another’s property for one’s own use.
See also: Property and Ownership
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abstraction - a concept or idea not associated with any specific instanceabstraction - a concept or idea not associated with any specific instance; "he loved her only in the abstract--not in person"
right - an abstract idea of that which is due to a person or governmental body by law or tradition or nature; "they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights"; "Certain rights can never be granted to the government but must be kept in the hands of the people"- Eleanor Roosevelt; "a right is not something that somebody gives you; it is something that nobody can take away"
concept, conception, construct - an abstract or general idea inferred or derived from specific instances
absolute - something that is conceived or that exists independently and not in relation to other things; something that does not depend on anything else and is beyond human control; something that is not relative; "no mortal being can influence the absolute"
teacher - a personified abstraction that teaches; "books were his teachers"; "experience is a demanding teacher"
thing - a special abstraction; "a thing of the spirit"; "things of the heart"
2.abstraction - the act of withdrawing or removing somethingabstraction - the act of withdrawing or removing something
remotion, removal - the act of removing; "he had surgery for the removal of a malignancy"
3.abstraction - the process of formulating general concepts by abstracting common properties of instances
theorisation, theorization - the production or use of theories
4.abstraction - an abstract paintingabstraction - an abstract painting      
painting, picture - graphic art consisting of an artistic composition made by applying paints to a surface; "a small painting by Picasso"; "he bought the painting as an investment"; "his pictures hang in the Louvre"
5.abstraction - preoccupation with something to the exclusion of all elseabstraction - preoccupation with something to the exclusion of all else
preoccupancy, preoccupation, engrossment, absorption - the mental state of being preoccupied by something
revery, reverie - an abstracted state of absorption
6.abstraction - a general concept formed by extracting common features from specific examples
entity - that which is perceived or known or inferred to have its own distinct existence (living or nonliving)
psychological feature - a feature of the mental life of a living organism
attribute - an abstraction belonging to or characteristic of an entity
group, grouping - any number of entities (members) considered as a unit
relation - an abstraction belonging to or characteristic of two entities or parts together
communication - something that is communicated by or to or between people or groups
quantity, measure, amount - how much there is or how many there are of something that you can quantify
otherworld - an abstract spiritual world beyond earthly reality
set - (mathematics) an abstract collection of numbers or symbols; "the set of prime numbers is infinite"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

abstraction

noun
1. concept, thought, idea, view, theory, impression, formula, notion, hypothesis, generalization, theorem, generality Is it worth fighting in the name of an abstraction?
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

abstraction

noun
The condition of being so lost in solitary thought as to be unaware of one's surroundings:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
абстракция

abstraction

[æbˈstrækʃən] N
1. (= act) → abstraccíón f
2. (= absent-mindedness) → distraimiento m, ensimismamiento m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

abstraction

[æbˈstrækʃən] n
(= abstract idea) → idée f abstraite
(= preoccupation) → air m préoccupé
(ART) (in art, sculpture)abstraction f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

abstraction

nAbstraktion f; (= abstract term also)Abstraktum nt; (= mental separation also)Abstrahieren nt; (= extraction: of information etc) → Entnahme f; (= absent-mindedness)Entrücktheit f (geh); to argue in abstractionsin abstrakten Begriffen or in Abstraktionen argumentieren
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

abstraction

[æbˈstrækʃn] n
a. (absence of mind) → distrazione f
b. (Philosophy) → astrazione f, concetto astratto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
She argues that the abstract concepts promoted by Japanese aesthetics find concrete expression at the most disparate levels of everyday life; that the abstract and the concrete actively coalesce in the domain of visuality, attesting to the eminently visual nature of Japanese culture at large; and that anime, as a major form of visual creation and expression, can help people appreciate many salient aspects of Japan's aesthetic legacy.
Students have long regarded science as a difficult subject because of hard and abstract concepts. Traditional science teaching has been depended mostly on visual instruction.
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(www.pro-seeds.com), an e-learning vendor specializing in the creation of on-line content for communicating abstract concepts in a clear and engaging format, estimates that universities most often allocate 2-3 million yen for the creation of a single e-learning course, "and when you multiply that figure by the number of courses required to establish even a basic program curriculum, you can see why some universities hesitate.
A seminal instructional, illustrating its abstract concepts with diagrams, discussion questions, supplementary exercises and exhaustive, in-depth text.
When conducting staff training sessions, taking active steps to make abstract concepts personally relevant is critical.
This stage is characterized by the logical use of symbols related to abstract concepts (Huitt & Hummel, 1998).
From abstract concepts such as time, morality and honor, to work, play and life cycles, the book illuminates the social and cultural world of the Renaissance at the level of individual and collective experience.
While such research reviews often are dry, Haroutounian is able to describe abstract concepts and ideas in a very understandable way and make them relevant to everyday experiences.