abstract expressionism

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abstract expressionism

n.
A school of painting that flourished after World War II until the early 1960s, characterized by the view that art is nonrepresentational and chiefly improvisational.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

abstract expressionism

n
(Art Movements) a school of painting in New York in the 1940s that combined the spontaneity of expressionism with abstract forms in unpremeditated, apparently random, compositions. See also action painting, tachisme
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ab′stract expres′sionism


n. (sometimes caps.)
experimental, nonrepresentational painting marked by spontaneous expression.
[1950–55, Amer.]
ab′stract expres′sionist, n., adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Abstract Expressionism

a spontaneous, intuitive painting technique producing nonformal work characterized by sinuous lines. Also called Action Painting.
See also: Art
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

abstract expressionism

(c. 1940–) A movement that developed in New York in the 1940s which broke away from the realism hitherto dominant in American art, and which became the first American movement to have a significant influence on European art. Notable pracitioners included Jackson Pollock (the main exponent of action painting) and De Kooning.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abstract expressionism - a New York school of painting characterized by freely created abstractionsAbstract Expressionism - a New York school of painting characterized by freely created abstractions; the first important school of American painting to develop independently of European styles
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
| 1956: Abstract expressionist artist Jackson Pollock died when his car hit a tree near East Hampton, New York.
This artist biography sheds light on the life, art, philosophy, writings, and impact of 20th-century Abstract Expressionist painter Agnes Martin.
Indeed, the seemingly "violent agitation" of Goldberg's paintings--a phrase used to describe the mental state of Jackson Pollock--not to say their convulsive, automatist, manic intensity or freewheeling chaos, is classically Abstract Expressionist. To borrow what Maurice de Vlaminck said of his own Fauvist phase, Goldberg seems to "paint with [his] heart and [his] loins, not bothering with style."
'The Great Vine' is an abstract expressionist rendition of a grape vine after having emerged from the fertile ground.
Providence-based abstract expressionist Edwin Wilwayco is now focused on small things like bubbles, dots, fractions, fragments, and spots, chasing them with whirling hands to restructure nature-bound abstract art works that he is known for, and, for many viewers, to approximate the infinite in his canvases.
AUBURN -- The Auburn Public Library, 369 Southbridge St., invites the greater Auburn community to an evening of art, music and film featuring the work of abstract expressionist photographer Louis Henri Pingitore.
The great American abstract expressionist Mark Rothko once said: "I'm interested only in expressing basic human emotions."
was an abstract expressionist painter, part of the post-WWII art scene and was even endorsed by the famed art collector and socialite, Peggy Guggenheim.
In her comprehensive biography of Joan Mitchell (1926-92), Patricia Albers constructs a vivid and tragic account of this painter's life, loves, and most important, her struggle to be recognized as an Abstract Expressionist of the first rank.
A 36-year-old woman was accused of causing $10,000 worth of damage to a painting by the late abstract expressionist artist Clyfford Still, a work valued at more than $30 million, authorities in the U.S.
As a student, he was impressed by a Polish art instructor at the academy but cites Spanish abstract expressionist painter Antoni Tapies as his major influence.
This is the third in a series of exhibits focusing on painters of the mid-to late 20th century whose work derives all or in part from the Abstract Expressionist movement.