abstraction

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Related to Abstractions: abstract thinking

ab·strac·tion

 (ăb-străk′shən, əb-)
n.
1.
a. The act of abstracting or the state of having been abstracted.
b. An abstract concept, idea, or term.
c. An abstract quality.
2. Preoccupation; absent-mindedness.
3. An abstract work of art.

ab·strac′tion·al, ab·strac′tive adj.

abstraction

(æbˈstrækʃən)
n
1. absence of mind; preoccupation
2. the process of formulating generalized ideas or concepts by extracting common qualities from specific examples
3. an idea or concept formulated in this way: good and evil are abstractions.
4. (Logic) logic an operator that forms a class name or predicate from any given expression. See also lambda calculus
5. (Art Terms) an abstract painting, sculpture, etc
6. the act of withdrawing or removing
abˈstractive adj
abˈstractively adv

ab•strac•tion

(æbˈstræk ʃən)

n.
1. an abstract or general idea or term.
2. the act of considering something in terms of general qualities, apart from concrete realities, specific objects, or actual instances.
3. absent-mindedness; inattention.
4. the quality of being abstract.
[1540–50; < Late Latin]
ab•strac′tion•al, adj.
ab•strac′tive, adj.

abstraction

the taking of another’s property for one’s own use.
See also: Property and Ownership
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abstraction - a concept or idea not associated with any specific instanceabstraction - a concept or idea not associated with any specific instance; "he loved her only in the abstract--not in person"
right - an abstract idea of that which is due to a person or governmental body by law or tradition or nature; "they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights"; "Certain rights can never be granted to the government but must be kept in the hands of the people"- Eleanor Roosevelt; "a right is not something that somebody gives you; it is something that nobody can take away"
concept, conception, construct - an abstract or general idea inferred or derived from specific instances
absolute - something that is conceived or that exists independently and not in relation to other things; something that does not depend on anything else and is beyond human control; something that is not relative; "no mortal being can influence the absolute"
teacher - a personified abstraction that teaches; "books were his teachers"; "experience is a demanding teacher"
thing - a special abstraction; "a thing of the spirit"; "things of the heart"
2.abstraction - the act of withdrawing or removing somethingabstraction - the act of withdrawing or removing something
remotion, removal - the act of removing; "he had surgery for the removal of a malignancy"
3.abstraction - the process of formulating general concepts by abstracting common properties of instances
theorisation, theorization - the production or use of theories
4.abstraction - an abstract paintingabstraction - an abstract painting      
painting, picture - graphic art consisting of an artistic composition made by applying paints to a surface; "a small painting by Picasso"; "he bought the painting as an investment"; "his pictures hang in the Louvre"
5.abstraction - preoccupation with something to the exclusion of all elseabstraction - preoccupation with something to the exclusion of all else
preoccupancy, preoccupation, engrossment, absorption - the mental state of being preoccupied by something
revery, reverie - an abstracted state of absorption
6.abstraction - a general concept formed by extracting common features from specific examples
entity - that which is perceived or known or inferred to have its own distinct existence (living or nonliving)
psychological feature - a feature of the mental life of a living organism
attribute - an abstraction belonging to or characteristic of an entity
group, grouping - any number of entities (members) considered as a unit
relation - an abstraction belonging to or characteristic of two entities or parts together
communication - something that is communicated by or to or between people or groups
quantity, measure, amount - how much there is or how many there are of something that you can quantify
otherworld - an abstract spiritual world beyond earthly reality
set - (mathematics) an abstract collection of numbers or symbols; "the set of prime numbers is infinite"

abstraction

noun
1. concept, thought, idea, view, theory, impression, formula, notion, hypothesis, generalization, theorem, generality Is it worth fighting in the name of an abstraction?

abstraction

noun
The condition of being so lost in solitary thought as to be unaware of one's surroundings:
Translations
абстракция

abstraction

[æbˈstrækʃən] N
1. (= act) → abstraccíón f
2. (= absent-mindedness) → distraimiento m, ensimismamiento m

abstraction

[æbˈstrækʃən] n
(= abstract idea) → idée f abstraite
(= preoccupation) → air m préoccupé
(ART) (in art, sculpture)abstraction f

abstraction

nAbstraktion f; (= abstract term also)Abstraktum nt; (= mental separation also)Abstrahieren nt; (= extraction: of information etc) → Entnahme f; (= absent-mindedness)Entrücktheit f (geh); to argue in abstractionsin abstrakten Begriffen or in Abstraktionen argumentieren

abstraction

[æbˈstrækʃn] n
a. (absence of mind) → distrazione f
b. (Philosophy) → astrazione f, concetto astratto
References in classic literature ?
And as to ideas, entities, abstractions, and transcendentals, I could never drive the least conception into their heads.
For me at least--in the circumstances then surrounding me--there arose out of the pure abstractions which the hypochondriac contrived to throw upon his canvas, an intensity of intolerable awe, no shadow of which felt I ever yet in the contemplation of the certainly glowing yet too concrete reveries of Fuseli.
The happy faces Arthur saw greeting him were not pale abstractions, but real ruddy faces, long familiar to him: Martin Poyser was there--the whole Poyser family.
But all these abstractions and eliminations made of his mind a rather empty and echoing place, and he supposed that was one of the reasons why the busy animated people on the Beaufort lawn shocked him as if they had been children playing in a grave-yard.
La Fontaine sauntered about from one to the other, a peripatetic, absent- minded, boring, unbearable dreamer, who kept buzzing and humming at everybody's elbow a thousand poetic abstractions.
Lydgate's nature demanded this combination: he was an emotional creature, with a flesh-and-blood sense of fellowship which withstood all the abstractions of special study.
Sometimes, however, we thought too long a distance in advance of our sounds, managed to achieve abstractions (dim ones I grant), which we failed utterly to make known to other folk.
Almost might it be said that he and the man could talk by the hour, although few and simple were the abstractions they could talk; very little of the immediate concrete past, and scarcely anything of the immediate concrete future, entered into their conversations.
His abnormal power of vision made abstractions take on concrete form.
Out of abstractions Ernest had conjured a vision and made them see it.
At one time we are in the clouds of mythology, at another among the abstractions of mathematics or metaphysics; we pass imperceptibly from one to the other.
In contrast to the pseudo-classical preference for abstractions, there is, among the Romanticists, a devotion to concrete things, the details of Nature and of life.