theatre of the absurd

(redirected from Absurdist theatre)

theatre of the absurd

n
(Theatre) drama in which normal conventions and dramatic structure are ignored or modified in order to present life as irrational or meaningless
References in periodicals archive ?
It looks primarily at three avant-garde Italian art intellectuals and their responses to the nascent form of film in the 1910s: Filippo Thommaso Marinetti, the founding figure of Futurism, Gabriele D'Annunzio, the leader of Italian Decadentism, and Luigi Pirandello, a father of European avant-garde and absurdist theatre.
Dissidents in Soviet Europe pioneered absurdist theatre as a means of protest because it was impossible to denounce the regime publicly.
It is a technique for the absurdist theatre, or the surrealistic, or for a "popular" musical didactic theatre like Sean O'Casey's or John Arden's; a modernist technique in fact, which allows Yeats to set a self-conscious prospective on the unconscious without damaging its plausibility or vitality.
We will do The Herne's Egg again, but our aim this time will focus more towards absurdist theatre where the audience feels led to see an ironic humor behind serious topics.
Mary's Catholic High School in Astley, England, who sees Gilbert as a "forerunner of the absurdist theatre of the twentieth century" (p.
03 issue (Trends & Events) about Samuel French's cease-and-desist order to the People's Branch Theatre because of the use of women actors portraying male characters, it strikes me that perhaps Godot has finally revealed himself in the form of the Beckett estate--and that Godot's mission, sadly, is to rid the Absurdist Theatre of anything that attempts to challenge itself and reach out to others.
One of the great beauties of Absurdist Theatre is its universal nature--that it can morph to the era of its production, the demands of the budget, and the creative strengths of its actors, directors and designers.
The New Jersey Shakespeare Festival at midseason, following admirable summer turns with "The Forest" by Russian playwright Alexander Ostrovsky and an enchanting production of "Twelfth Night," has uncaged the well-known avant-garde comedy "Rhinoceros" by the influential father of absurdist theatre Eugene Ionesco.
This great director of absurdist theatre has the intellectual insight, the ironic edge, and the technical poise to turn Havel's texts into swift and devastating exposes of dehumanized society.
Havel's first important play was Zahradni slavnost (1963; translated as The Garden Party, 1969), in which he used the devices of absurdist theatre to satirize the dehumanization of language, human relations, and social institutions.
With its potential for sudden, height-ended violence, its amp amputee grotesqueries and its Ionesco-esque housebound close to the area of absurdist theatre as I've ever gotten.
Absurdist theatre, she said, is no more nihilistic than the Old Testament book of Ecciesiastes, chapter 1, verse 2--"Emptiness, emptiness, says the Speaker, emptiness, all is empty.