acacia

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a·ca·cia

 (ə-kā′shə)
n.
1. Any of various often spiny trees or shrubs of the genus Acacia in the pea family, having alternate, bipinnately compound leaves or leaves represented by flattened leafstalks and heads or spikes of small flowers.
2. Any of several other plants in the pea family, especially of the genus Robinia.

[Middle English, from Latin, from Greek akakiā.]

acacia

(əˈkeɪʃə)
n
1. (Plants) any shrub or tree of the tropical and subtropical leguminous genus Acacia, having compound or reduced leaves and small yellow or white flowers in dense inflorescences. Also called: acacia tree See also wattle14
2. (Plants) false acacia another name for locust2, locust3
3. (Plants) gum acacia another name for gum arabic
[C16: from Latin, from Greek akakia, perhaps related to akē point]

a•ca•cia

(əˈkeɪ ʃə)

n., pl. -cias.
1. a small tree or shrub of the genus Acacia, of the legume family, having clusters of small yellow flowers.
2. any of several other plants, as the locust tree.
[1535–45; < Latin < Greek akakía Egyptian thorn]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acacia - any of various spiny trees or shrubs of the genus Acaciaacacia - any of various spiny trees or shrubs of the genus Acacia
genus Acacia - large genus of shrubs and trees and some woody vines of Central and South America, Africa, Australia and Polynesia: wattle; mimosa
shittah, shittah tree - source of a wood mentioned frequently in the Bible; probably a species of genus Acacia
wattle - any of various Australasian trees yielding slender poles suitable for wattle
Acacia catechu, catechu, Jerusalem thorn - East Indian spiny tree having twice-pinnate leaves and yellow flowers followed by flat pods; source of black catechu
huisache, mimosa bush, scented wattle, sweet acacia, sweet wattle, Acacia farnesiana, cassie, flame tree - tropical American thorny shrub or small tree; fragrant yellow flowers used in making perfumery
Acacia xanthophloea, fever tree - African tree supposed to mark healthful regions
tree - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
gum acacia, gum arabic - gum from an acacia tree; used as a thickener (especially in candies and pharmaceuticals)
Translations
akaasiaakasia

acacia

[əˈkeɪʃə] Nacacia f

acacia

[əˈkeɪʃə] n (also acacia tree) → acacia m

acacia

n (also acacia tree)Akazie f

acacia

[əˈkeɪʃə] n (acacias or acacia (pl)) → acacia
References in periodicals archive ?
A mature acacia tree can yield up to 15 bags of charcoal, depending on how one contains oxygen intake into the kiln.
DOWNED ACACIA - A car is hit by an acacia tree that was blown down by the storm's winds in Barangay Cogon-Ramos, Cebu City.
For more than three years, parishioners of Our Lady of Assumption Shrine here were hearing Masses before a makeshift altar under the shade of a century-old acacia tree.
I particularly liked the drawing of Etabo and the naughty goat, Keti, sitting in the acacia tree.
Jibrell, who was born in 1947 to a nomadic pastoral- ist lifestyle in the northern Somali (then British Somal- iland) region of Sanaag, has felt a special affinity for the acacia tree since childhood.
Summary: "One acacia tree may cost up to Dh5,000 in the black market.
The material lacks a protein allergen found in the gum Arabic derived from the acacia tree, and it is free of undesirable terpenoid compounds present in US sources of the polysaccharide --the western larch tree.
What's more, it lacks a protein allergen found in the gum Arabic derived from the acacia tree, and it is free of undesirable terpenoid compounds present in domestic sources of the polysaccharide--notably the western larch tree.
Was it the original owner at his banana plantation shop after zeroing (undoubtedly with Kynoch), or was it a talented local villager turned blacksmith working under the shade of an acacia tree in the hot African sun?
Right: A tour group shadows a lion BIG CAT DIARY BURNING laser beams through the branches of an Acacia tree, the leopard's gaze xes on a point far in the distance.
Rarer still is a leopard sighting and we were lucky not only to see one emerge from the grass but grunt and call for its cub which dutifully came and was led to the shelter of a nearby acacia tree.
Visual Stereotypes: Africa The blog Africa Is A Country is taking lazy book cover designers to task, because apparently a silhouetted acacia tree = Africa