tenure

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ten·ure

 (tĕn′yər, -yo͝or′)
n.
1.
a. The act, fact, manner, or condition of holding something in one's possession, as real estate or an office; occupation.
b. A period during which something is held.
2. The status of holding one's position on a permanent basis without periodic contract renewals: a teacher granted tenure on a faculty.

[Middle English, from Old French teneure, from tenir, to hold, from Latin tenēre, to hold; see ten- in Indo-European roots.]

ten·u′ri·al (-yo͝or′ē-əl) adj.
ten·u′ri·al·ly adv.

tenure

(ˈtɛnjʊə; ˈtɛnjə)
n
1. the possession or holding of an office or position
2. the length of time an office, position, etc, lasts; term
3. (Education) chiefly US and Canadian the improved security status of a person after having been in the employ of the same company or institution for a specified period
4. (Education) the right to permanent employment until retirement, esp for teachers, lecturers, etc
5. (Law) property law
a. the holding or occupying of property, esp realty, in return for services rendered, etc
b. the duration of such holding or occupation
[C15: from Old French, from Medieval Latin tenitūra, ultimately from Latin tenēre to hold]
tenˈurial adj
tenˈurially adv

ten•ure

(ˈtɛn yər)

n., v. -ured, -ur•ing. n.
1. the holding or possessing of anything: the tenure of an office.
2. the holding of property, esp. real property, of a superior in return for services to be rendered.
3. the period or term of holding something.
4. status granted to an employee indicating that the position or employment is permanent.
v.t.
5. to give tenure to.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French; Old French teneure < Vulgar Latin *tenitura=*tenit(us), for Latin tentus, past participle of tenēre to hold + -ura -ure]
ten•u′ri•al (-ˈyʊər i əl) adj.
ten•u′ri•al•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tenure - the term during which some position is held
term - a limited period of time; "a prison term"; "he left school before the end of term"
presidency, presidential term, administration - the tenure of a president; "things were quiet during the Eisenhower administration"
vice-presidency, vice-presidential term - the tenure of a vice president
episcopate - the term of office of a bishop
2.tenure - the right to hold property; part of an ancient hierarchical system of holding lands
legal right - a right based in law
copyhold - a medieval form of land tenure in England; a copyhold was a parcel of land granted to a peasant by the lord of the manor in return for agricultural services
freehold - tenure by which land is held in fee simple or for life
villeinage - tenure by which a villein held land
Verb1.tenure - give life-time employment to; "She was tenured after she published her book"
academe, academia - the academic world
elevate, kick upstairs, promote, upgrade, advance, raise - give a promotion to or assign to a higher position; "John was kicked upstairs when a replacement was hired"; "Women tend not to advance in the major law firms"; "I got promoted after many years of hard work"

tenure

noun
1. occupancy, holding, occupation, residence, tenancy, possession, proprietorship Lack of security of tenure meant that many became homeless.
2. term of office, term, incumbency, period in office, time his short tenure of the Labour leadership

tenure

noun
The holding of something, such as a position:
Translations
世襲保有保有期間終身

tenure

[ˈtenjʊəʳ]
A. N
1. [of land] → posesión f, tenencia f, ocupación f; [of office] → ocupación f, ejercicio m
2. (= guaranteed employment) → puesto m asegurado, permanencia f
teacher with tenureprofesor(a) m/f de número, profesor(a) m/f numerario/a
teacher without tenureprofesor(a) m/f no numerario/a
B. CPD tenure track position (US) → puesto m con posibilidad de obtener la permanencia

tenure

[ˈtɛnjər ˈtɛnjʊər] n
(= right of occupancy) [property, land] → bail m
(= period of office) période d'occupation d'un poste
(UNIVERSITY) (= right to permanent employment) → titularisation f
to have tenure → être titulaire

tenure

n
(= holding of office)Anstellung f; (= period of office)Amtszeit f
(of property) during her tenure of the house/farmwährend sie das Haus/die Farm innehatte; laws governing land tenureLandpachtgesetze pl

tenure

[ˈtɛnjʊəʳ] n (of land) → possesso; (of office) → incarico
to have tenure (guaranteed employment) → essere di ruolo
References in periodicals archive ?
Scholars who excel at research tend to get academic tenure.
Does the president have academic tenure or some other form of continuing retreat rights?
Academic tenure may be the most conspicuous privilege that needs to be addressed - and defended.
He went on to discuss academic tenure - the longstanding practice by universities nationwide of awarding professors what in many cases is in effect a lifetime job guarantee.
She supervised 150 students during her academic tenure.
Since its founding a century ago and its 1915 Declaration of Principles on Academic Freedom and Academic Tenure, the association has argued that both public and private schools essentially work for the common good.
In translating the war frame to the academic tenure wars, one must similarly keep the goals of restoring the peace, preventing future violations, and rebuilding institutional stability as the highest priorities.
Tan's academic tenure, he has developed a PhD program in Construction (previously non-existent), supervised over 15 PhD candidates and over 50 Master's Degree candidates, and established the Construction Laboratory for Automation and System Simulation.
With more faculty and administrations buying into the benefits of tenure and the AAUP continuing to argue for its implementation, academic tenure became pervasive throughout the US by the 1960s, coinciding with mandatory SET (Metzger, 1973).
The scholarly publication business process begins with a system--fully supported by higher education institutions--that demands "high-impact" publication as a condition of achieving the holy grail of academic tenure.
They were summarized in classic form by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) in its 1915 Declaration of Principles on Academic Freedom and Academic Tenure.
The concept flourished in the Progressive Era, and the formation of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), along with the 1915 adoption of a Declaration of Principles on Academic Freedom and Academic Tenure, codified its principles (Calhoun, 2009; Scott, 2009).

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