academy

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Related to Academie: Academie Francaise

a·cad·e·my

 (ə-kăd′ə-mē)
n. pl. a·cad·e·mies
1. A school for special instruction.
2. A secondary or college-preparatory school, especially a private one.
3.
a. The academic community; academe: "When there's moral leadership from the White House and from the academy, people tend to adjust" (Jesse Jackson).
b. Higher education in general. Used with the.
c. A society of scholars, scientists, or artists.
4. Academy
a. Plato's school for advanced education and the first institutional school of philosophy.
b. Platonism.
c. The disciples of Plato.

[Latin Acadēmīa, the school where Plato taught, from Greek Akadēmeia.]

academy

(əˈkædəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
1. (Education) an institution or society for the advancement of literature, art, or science
2. a school for training in a particular skill or profession: a military academy.
3. (Education) a secondary school: now used only as part of a name, and often denoting a private school
[C16: via Latin from Greek akadēmeia name of the grove where Plato taught, named after the legendary hero Akadēmos]

Academy

(əˈkædəmɪ)
n
1. (Placename)
a. the grove or garden near Athens where Plato taught in the late 4th century bc
b. the school of philosophy founded by Plato
c. the members of this school and their successors
2. short for the French Academy, Royal Academy

a•cad•e•my

(əˈkæd ə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
1. a secondary or high school, esp. a private one.
2. a school or college for special instruction or training in a subject: a military academy.
3. an association for the advancement of art, literature, or science.
4. a group of authorities and leaders in a field of scholarship, art, etc., who are often permitted to dictate standards, prescribe methods, and criticize new ideas.
5. the Academy,
a. the Platonic school of philosophy or its adherents.
b. the public grove in Athens where Plato taught.
[1470–80; < Latin acadēmīa < Greek akadḗmeia=Akádēm(os) a legendary Attic hero after whom the grove and gymnasium where Plato taught were named + -eia n. suffix (compare -ia)]

academy

- Came from Akademos, the man or demigod for whom Plato's garden, where he taught, was named.
See also related terms for taught.

Academy

 a society of learned men; a school of learning. See also college, institute.
Examples: an academy of fanaticism, 1761; the living academy of love-lore, 1754; academy of learned men.

academy

A school, especially a private school, or a place where a particular subject is taught.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.academy - a secondary school (usually private)academy - a secondary school (usually private)
Gymnasium, lycee, lyceum, middle school, secondary school - a school for students intermediate between elementary school and college; usually grades 9 to 12
2.academy - an institution for the advancement of art or science or literatureacademy - an institution for the advancement of art or science or literature
institution, establishment - an organization founded and united for a specific purpose
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences - an academy that gives annual awards for achievements in motion picture production and performance
Academy of Television Arts and Sciences - an academy that gives annual awards for outstanding achievements in television
French Academy - an honorary group of French writers and thinkers supported by the French government; "the French Academy sets standards for the use of the French language"
National Academy of Sciences - an honorary American society of scientists created by President Lincoln during the American Civil War
Royal Academy, Royal Academy of Arts - an honorary academy in London (founded in 1768) intended to cultivate painting and sculpture and architecture in Britain
Royal Society, Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge - an honorary English society (formalized in 1660 and given a royal charter by Charles II in 1662) through which the British government has supported science
academician - someone elected to honorary membership in an academy
3.academy - a school for special trainingacademy - a school for special training  
school - an educational institution; "the school was founded in 1900"
yeshiva, yeshivah - an academy for the advanced study of Jewish texts (primarily the Talmud)
police academy - an academy for training police officers
military academy - an academy for training military officers
naval academy - an academy for training naval officers
air force academy - an academy for training air force officers
Plato's Academy - a school established by Plato in ancient Athens; "Plato's Academy continued for several hundred years after Plato died"
4.academy - a learned establishment for the advancement of knowledgeacademy - a learned establishment for the advancement of knowledge
establishment - a public or private structure (business or governmental or educational) including buildings and equipment for business or residence

academy

noun college, school, university, institution, institute, establishment, seminary, centre of learning her experience as a police academy instructor
Translations
أَكَادِيـمِيَّةأكَادِيمِيَّهكُلِّيَهمَجْمَع
akademiestřední škola
akademihøjskole
akatemiakorkeakouluseminaariyliopisto
akademija
akadémia
framhaldsskóliháskóli; æîri menntastofnunheiîurstofnun vísinda- og listamanna
学士院
학원
akademijaakademinisakademiškaidėstytojasgimnazija
akadēmijaaugstskolamācību iestāde
akadémia
akademi
สถาบันศึกษา
akademiyüksek okul
học viện

academy

[əˈkædəmɪ]
A. N
1. (= private college) → academia f (Scot) → instituto m (de segunda enseñanza), colegio m
academy of musicconservatorio m
academy for young ladiescolegio m para señoritas
see also military, naval
2. (= learned society) → academia f
the Spanish Academyla Real Academia Española
see also royal
B. CPD Academy Award N (Cine) → galardón m de la Academia de Hollywood, Oscar m

academy

[əˈkædəmi] n
(= learned body) → académie f
(= school) → collège m
military academy → école f militaire
naval academy → école f navale
academy of music → conservatoire mAcademy Award noscar m

academy

nAkademie f; naval/military academyMarine-/Militärakademie f; academy for young ladies˜ höhere Töchterschule

academy

[əˈkædəmɪ] n (learned body) → accademia; (school) → scuola privata
academy of music (Brit) → conservatorio
military/naval academy → accademia militare/navale

academy

(əˈkӕdəmi) plural aˈcademies noun
1. a higher school for special study. Academy of Music.
2. a society to encourage science, art etc. The Royal Academy.
3. a type of senior school.
academic (ӕkəˈdemik) adjective
of or concerning study especially in schools, colleges etc. an academic career.
noun
a university or college teacher.
academic ˈyear noun
that part of the year when students go to school, college or university. The academic year ends in June.
acaˈdemically (ӕkəˈde-) adverb

academy

أَكَادِيـمِيَّة akademie akademi Akademie ακαδημία academia akatemia académie akademija accademia 学士院 학원 academie høyskole akademia academia академия akademi สถาบันศึกษา akademi học viện 学院
References in classic literature ?
I have promised to escort to the Academie a Greek princess of my acquaintance who has never seen your grand opera, and who relies on me to conduct her thither.
A wealthy manufacturer of New Brunswick had died and left part of his fortune to endow a large number of scholarships to be distributed among the various high schools and academies of the Maritime Provinces, according to their respective standings.
Although schoolmistresses' letters are to be trusted no more nor less than churchyard epitaphs; yet, as it sometimes happens that a person departs this life who is really deserving of all the praises the stone cutter carves over his bones; who IS a good Christian, a good parent, child, wife, or husband; who actually DOES leave a disconsolate family to mourn his loss; so in academies of the male and female sex it occurs every now and then that the pupil is fully worthy of the praises bestowed by the disinterested instructor.
When Don Lorenzo had finished reciting his gloss, Don Quixote stood up, and in a loud voice, almost a shout, exclaimed as he grasped Don Lorenzo's right hand in his, "By the highest heavens, noble youth, but you are the best poet on earth, and deserve to be crowned with laurel, not by Cyprus or by Gaeta- as a certain poet, God forgive him, said- but by the Academies of Athens, if they still flourished, and by those that flourish now, Paris, Bologna, Salamanca.
This magnificent art produced by the Vandals has been slain by the academies.
Academies and minor edifices of learning meet the eye of the stranger at every few miles as be winds his way through this uneven territory, and places for the worship of God abound with that frequency which characterize a moral and reflecting people, and with that variety of exterior and canonical government which flows from unfettered liberty of conscience.
Some of these societies were well established institutions existing for centuries, like the Academie francaise, others were short-lived like the ephemeral "Altdorfer Ceres-Gesellschaft" whose playful statutes read like a parody of those of more serious societies and whose meetings were characterized by a high consumption of beer and production of epitaphs on dogs (cf.
There seems to be confusion between the Academie Royale de Danse, which Louis XIV established in 1661, and the Paris Opera.
The Academie Francaise, which would become Europe's best-known literary academy, began in 1635.
Budgetary constraints may hinder Kenya Volleyball Federation's plans to run age group academies across the country.
Ormiston Academies Trust (OAT) has awarded Capita Managed IT Solutions a four-year ICT Services Framework contract, offering the Trusts academies the option to procure a range of cost-effective outsourced ICT services.
Simone Testa, Italian Academies and their Networks 1525-1700, The Renaissance Society of America, Palgrave MacMillan: New York, 2015; 304 pp.