aralia

(redirected from Acanthophora)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

aralia

(əˈreɪlɪə)
n
1. (Plants) any plant of the genus Aralia of trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants. The greenhouse and house plant generally known as aralia is Schefflera elegantissima of a related genus, grown for its decorative evergreen foliage: family Araliaceae
2. (Botany) any plant of the genus Aralia of trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants. The greenhouse and house plant generally known as aralia is Schefflera elegantissima of a related genus, grown for its decorative evergreen foliage: family Araliaceae
[New Latin, of uncertain origin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aralia - any of various plants of the genus Araliaaralia - any of various plants of the genus Aralia; often aromatic plants having compound leaves and small umbellate flowers
genus Aralia - type genus of Araliaceae; large widely distributed genus of shrubs and trees and vines: spikenard; Hercules'-club
ligneous plant, woody plant - a plant having hard lignified tissues or woody parts especially stems
References in periodicals archive ?
Four of the seven species collected, such as Acanthophora spicifera (M.
that of SPs from the red seaweed Acanthophora muscoides, which resulted in sulfated oligosaccharides using this same experimental assay in another study (Rodrigues et al., 2016).
The carrageenan species that can be found in the Philippines include Eucheuma, Hypnea, Acanthophora and Kappaphycus.
For instance, hexane extracts of Indian seaweeds (Kappaphycus alvarezi, Acanthophora spicifera, Gracilaria corticata, and G.
(1998) found that Acanthophora muscoides and Microdictyon pseudohapteron collected from India were toxic to Artemia larvae.
Salem, "Isolation and identification of a flavone apigenin from marine red alga Acanthophora spicifera with antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities," Journal of Experimental Neuroscience, vol.
Values of yield and composition vary among species of the order Ceramiales as a result of heterogeneity of these biopolymers, such as in Acanthophora spicifera (3.6-6.6% yield; 27-51% total hexoses and 8-20% sulfate, respectively) (Duarte et al., 2004).
The alcoholic extract of the red alga Acanthophora spicifera exhibits in vivo tumoricidal activity by increasing the mean survival time, decreasing tumor volume and viable cell count (207).
Tropical soda apple (TSA), Solanum viarum Dunal, is a perennial South American shrub in the Acanthophora section, subgenus Leptostemonum ('spiny solanums') in the family Solanaceae (Nee 1991).