acaricide

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Related to Acaricides: miticide

a·car·i·cide

 (ə-kăr′ĭ-sīd′)
n.
A substance or agent that kills ticks and mites.

[New Latin acarus, mite; see acarid + -cide.]

a·car′i·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.

acaricide

(əˈkærɪˌsaɪd)
n
(Pharmacology) any drug or formulation for killing acarids

acaricide

a substance or preparation for killing mites or ticks.
See also: Infestation, Killing
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acaricide - a chemical agent used to kill mitesacaricide - a chemical agent used to kill mites
pesticide - a chemical used to kill pests (as rodents or insects)
Translations
acaricide
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 PRESSWIRE-August 19, 2019-: Acaricides Market - Global Insights, Growth, Size, Comparative Analysis, Trends, Technology Status, Demands, Segmentation and Forecast to 2023
I revised the disease detection system, retrained the workers and changed the hay source back to the original supplier.The animals were also washed with acaricides twice per week and the problem was resolved.
The advisory said that public health advice should focus on several aspects including wear protective clothing (long sleeves, long trousers), wear light coloured clothing during visit to animal market to allow easy detection of ticks on the clothes and regularly examine clothing and skin for ticks and if found, remove them safely and use approved acaricides or repellents on clothing and skin.
'Always examine the animals for ticks especially on ears, armpits, axilla, abdominal region, teats or udder and region below the tail,' said the official advisory; adding, tick control with approved acaricides (chemicals intended to kill ticks) was an important option.
Several studies have focused on testing the efficacy of a wide range of acaricides against ticks (in vitro, in vivo and both).
insecticides and acaricides: pirineks, ce (chlorpyrifos, 480 g / l), adama registrations b.
Use of the chemical acaricides and kind of vectors (Tick/Mosquito) were recorded according to the farmer's statements.
The department shared that the disease could spread to humans either by tick-bites, or through contact with disease-infected animal tissues during and immediately post-slaughter and advised using acaricides (pesticides designed for ticks and mites).
Moreover, high costs are associated with acaricides used in infested livestock (Walton et al., 2004).
Several factors are identified as responsible for outbreaks, such as the banning of some broad spectrum insecticides and acaricides, frequent dry spells, use of new varieties with characteristics that may favor the development of mite populations, and the hormesis effect caused by new pesticides (Guedes & Cutler 2014; Guedes et al.
World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (W.A.A.V.P.) guidelines for evaluating the efficacy of acaricides against ticks (Ixodidae) on ruminants.