acceleration of free fall

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acceleration of free fall

n
(Atomic Physics) the acceleration of a body falling freely in a vacuum near the surface of the earth in the earth's gravitational field: the standard value is 9.806 65 metres per second per second or 32.174 feet per second per second. Symbol: g Also called: acceleration due to gravity or acceleration of gravity
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References in periodicals archive ?
The steeper the downhill angle, the larger the component of acceleration due to gravity. Looking at the sine curve in Graph A at right, you can see that a 30-de-gree angle has a sine value of 0.5 (yellow circles).
Therefore, the motion of a simple pendulum depends only on the length (L) of the string and the value of the acceleration due to gravity (g).
Where h is the jump height, F is the vertical ground reaction force, m is the body mass, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and t is the time.
The frequency of the shaking table ranged from 0.4 Hz to 15 Hz, with a corresponding maximum amplitude of 100 mm and a maximum acceleration of 1.2 g, where g is the acceleration due to gravity. Prior to each experimental test, the input accelerated wave motion was calibrated to ensure accurate experimental measurements.
The principle states that in vacuum, the acceleration due to gravity should be identical for all objects, irrespective of their mass.
(3) For example, in chapter 2, he says "indistinguishability leads directly to the famous Pauli exclusion principle (not true--one also needs the fermionic nature of electrons) and in chapter 6, he tells us that an "elevator's acceleration due to gravity cancels the gravitational force, and the freely falling elevator becomes an inertial reference frame" (gravity--that is, the curvature of space--causes the acceleration, rather than canceling it; by "inertial frame" we usually mean a non-accelerating frame).
The 'standard' acceleration due to gravity at the Earth's surface s 9.8m per second squared
* Acceleration due to gravity (g): 9.81 m/[s.sup.2]
I remember having to do experiments in a physics class once to prove that the acceleration due to gravity is 9.81 m/s2 and I thought this was idiotic.
The X axis reaches an acceleration of 1.5 g (g = acceleration due to gravity) while they axis can reach an acceleration of 3 g.
where m is the mass of the system (shank, foot, and lever arm), g is the acceleration due to gravity, [r.sub.T] is the distance from the axis of rotation to the system center of mass (i.e., the total system radius of rotation), and e is the angle of displacement from vertical (where the net torque equals zero).