accompt

Related to accompt: puissance

accompt

(əˈkɒmpt)
n
an account
vb (tr)
to account
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
"An Sir Kay had had time to get another skin of sour wine into him, ye had seen the accompt doubled."
``Well, Prior,'' said the Outlaw, ``I will detain thee no longer here than to give the Jew a quittance for the six hundred crowns at which thy ransom is fixed I accept of him for my pay-master; and if I hear that ye boggle at allowing him in his accompts the sum so paid by him, Saint Mary refuse me, an I burn not the abbey over thine head, though I hang ten years the sooner!''
Some of these instructions are truly surprising, as for example Sullivan's remark about Private Willis's "When all night long," which opens act 2: "1st eight bars of song to be sung ad lib: like a gentleman at a public dinner without accompt" (part C, p.
[DACC.sub.it] = [[beta].sub.0]+ [[beta].sub.1] [(FD).sub.it] + [[beta].sub.2][(AQ).sub.it] + [[beta].sub.3][(ACCOMPT).sub.it] + [[beta].sub.4][(ACMEET).sub.it] + [[beta].sub.5][(ACSIZE).sub.it] + [epsilon] it
They 'will give to God and and [sic] the Kinge a just accompt'.
It would be iniquitous and unnecessary to give an action in such a case for plainly the popular action cannot destroy the private action; and it would be hard beyond measure to oblige every person to [defend] a popular action where he is liable to be called to accompt a second time at the instance of the private party.
The teacher's task of carrying the students on the wings of blank verse while clearly not of as "great accompt" is no less daunting as one enacts the roles of transmitter, translator and caretaker, all in one.
(6.) John Spreull, An Accompt Current betwixt Scotland and England Balanced Together with an Essay of a Scheme of the Product of Scotland, Edinburgh, 1705, 25, NLS, Rare Book Collection, 1.112(2); T.C.
On its title page, SC6/JASI/ 1646 is described as "The Declaration of the Accompt of Sir George Carew" for "Anglia" for the year "Anno HP" 1605." The first ten folios list rents and revenues from the Queen's manors in England, followed by folios specifying payments to members of her household and others, including Mountjoy and Cooksberry.
(9) The difficulty with the visual arts lies in persuading viewers to 'play ball'; artists cannot, as Shakespeare did, demand help from their audience's imagination: And let us, ciphers to this great accompt, On your imaginary forces work.