accrual

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Related to Accrued Expense: unearned revenue, Accrued Revenue

ac·cru·al

 (ə-kro͞o′əl)
n.
1. The act or process of accumulating; an increase.
2. Something that accumulates or increases.

accrual

(əˈkruːəl)
n
1. the act of accruing
2. something that has accrued
3. (Accounting & Book-keeping) accounting a charge incurred in one accounting period that has not been paid by the end of it

ac•cru•al

(əˈkru əl)

n.
1. the act or process of accruing.
2. something accrued.
[1875–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.accrual - the act of accumulatingaccrual - the act of accumulating    
step-up, increase - the act of increasing something; "he gave me an increase in salary"
buildup - the act of building up an accumulation; "I envied his rapid buildup of assets"; "a military buildup in preparation for the invasion"
Translations

accrual

[əˈkrʊəl] N (frm) → acumulación f

accrual

[əˈkruːəl] n (= accumulation) → accumulation f accrual rateaccrual rate ntaux m cumulé

accrual

n
(= accumulation)Ansammlung f; (Fin: of interest) → Auflaufen nt; (= addition)Hinzukommen nt
accruals pl (Fin: = liabilities) → Verbindlichkeiten pl
References in periodicals archive ?
To deduct an accrued expense, an accrual-basis taxpayer must satisfy an all-events test.
The income is treated as ordinary to the liquidated partner, but the related accrued expense is not.
Unless separate sub-accounts are used to capture the accrued expense versus the payments and other adjustments to an accrued liability account, the only way to compute the expense versus the payments would be to review every transaction (journal entry) that was made to the accrued liability accounts.
Estes also listed an accrued expense of $650 for information technology costs; $1,440 for cable air time; and $720 for a fund-raising event.
The IRS argued that once section 267(a)(2) disallowed a deduction for an accrued expense for a given tax year, the expense could not be deducted until it was paid.
Thus, the accrued liability on the balance sheet would reflect the difference between cumulative accrued expense and amounts paid (or funded).
In performing the accounting, annual expense should be computed first; the accrued liability reported in the balance sheet will then reflect the difference between the cumulative accrued expense and the actual amounts that are paid or funded.
The excess accrued expense primarily includes old legacy expense from the same previous discontinued subsidiary in 2005.