Acer saccharum


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Related to Acer saccharum: sugar maple, Acer rubrum
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Noun1.Acer saccharum - maple of eastern and central North America having three-lobed to five-lobed leaves and hard close-grained wood much used for cabinet work especially the curly-grained formAcer saccharum - maple of eastern and central North America having three-lobed to five-lobed leaves and hard close-grained wood much used for cabinet work especially the curly-grained form; sap is chief source of maple syrup and maple sugar; many subspecies
maple - any of numerous trees or shrubs of the genus Acer bearing winged seeds in pairs; north temperate zone
References in periodicals archive ?
Reich, "Water relations and gas exchange of Acer saccharum seedlings in contrasting natural light and water regimes," Tree Physiology, vol.
Acer saccharum Marsh, (sugar maple) is one of the most important native hardwood trees in eastern North America (Fowells, 1965).
(6.9[+ or -]2.6), Quercus alba (6.0[+ or -]2.6%), Quercus falcata (5.2[+ or -]2.6%) and Acer saccharum (4.8[+ or -]1.8%).
Volk; held in FP-102443-Sp (white culture by the rot) Northern Research Station, USDA Forest Service, and Michigan Technological University Fungus Substrate/host Xylaria polymorpha SR001 Acer saccharum (zone lines, white rot) X polymorpha SRO 10 A.
The most abundant species was Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum) at 17.5% followed by Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum) at 8.8%, White Ash (Fraxinus americana) at 8.2% most of which are dead due to Emerald Ash Borer, Boxelder (Acer negundo) at 8.1%, Hop-hornbeam (Ostrya virginiana) at 5.4%, Red Oak (Quercus rubra) at 5.3% and Black Walnut (Juglans nigra) at 4.8%.
Acer saccharum, juglans nigra, pterocarpus soyauxii.
The most popular syrup tree--the sugar maple (Acer saccharum)--grows in the northeastern United States and eastern Canada.
To begin with, the would-be sugar maker must be able to identify his/her maples: sugar maple (Acer saccharum), and black maple (Acer nigrum) are the two maple species used commercially.
The trees that contribute to the famous "New England glow" - scarlet oak (Quercus coccinea), silver maple (Acer saccharinum), red maple (Acer rubrum) and sugar maple (Acer saccharum) - are expected to be at their very best this month and in November, thanks to the extreme temperatures and bright sunlight, conditions these American species experience in their natural habitat in the north east USA.
Today, syrup is made from the sap of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.); however, most other maples can also be used.
Moose used balsam fir, eastern hemlock, and red maple proportionally more than their availability, used sugar maple (Acer saccharum), yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis), and mountain ash (Sorbus americana) proportionally less than their availability, and used striped maple, beaked hazel (Corylus cornuta), and mountain maple (Acer spicatum) proportional to their availability.
Within the genus or family of maple trees, for instance, a red maple is Acer rubrum and a sugar maple is Acer saccharum.