acetylcholine

(redirected from Acetylcholin)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

a·ce·tyl·cho·line

 (ə-sēt′l-kō′lēn′)
n.
A substance, C7H17NO3, that is derived from choline and is released at the ends of nerve fibers in the somatic and parasympathetic nervous systems, where it mediates the transmission of nerve impulses.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

acetylcholine

(ˌæsɪtaɪlˈkəʊliːn; -lɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) a chemical substance secreted at the ends of many nerve fibres, esp in the autonomic nervous system, and responsible for the transmission of nervous impulses. Formula: CH3CO2(CH2)2N(CH3)3+
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•ce•tyl•cho•line

(əˌsit lˈkoʊ lin, əˌsɛt-)

n.
a short-acting neurotransmitter, widely distributed in the body, that functions as a nervous system stimulant, a vasodilator, and a cardiac depressant.
Abbr.: ACh
[1905–10]
a•ce`tyl•cho•lin′ic (-ˈlɪn ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

acetylcholine

A neurotransmitter that triggers activity by muscles or secretory glands.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acetylcholine - a neurotransmitter that is a derivative of cholineacetylcholine - a neurotransmitter that is a derivative of choline; released at the ends of nerve fibers in the somatic and parasympathetic nervous systems
neurotransmitter - a neurochemical that transmits nerve impulses across a synapse
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
AcetylcholinAzetylcholin
References in periodicals archive ?
Inhibition of acetylcholin esterase (AChE), the enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of ACh, elevates ACh levels, and thus is considered a promising strategy for temporarily addressing AD symptoms, such as memory loss and confusion, though not for curing Alzheimer's disease or stopping it from progressing (Mesulam 2004).
Treatment also includes acetylcholin esterase inhibitors, music and movement therapy [25], carnitine, hyperbaric oxygen treatment [2], immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory treatment, oxytocin, and vision therapy, multivitamin/mineral complex, PUFA, elimination diets, acupuncture, auditory integration training, and massage [26].
The Danish researchers have therefore tested 22 abort inducing plants in the lab on rat tissue, and several of the plants had close to the same effect as the control drug acetylcholin.