Achitophel


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Achitophel

(əˈkɪtəˌfɛl)
n
(Bible) Bible the Douay spelling of Ahithophel
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
'Absalom and Achitophel' he drew the portrait of Buckingham as Zimri.
Hereupon Dryden, at the suggestion, it is said, of the king, and with the purpose of securing Shaftesbury's conviction, put forth the First Part of 'Absalom and Achitophel,' a masterly satire of Shaftesbury, Monmouth, and their associates in the allegorical disguise of the (somewhat altered) Biblical story of David and Absalom.
His death followed shortly, but meanwhile appeared the Second Part of 'Absalom and Achitophel,' chiefly a commonplace production written by Nahum Tate (joint author of Tate and Brady's paraphrase of the Psalms into English hymn-form), but with some passages by Dryden.]
In satiric and didactic verse Dryden is accepted as the chief English master, and here 'Absalom and Achitophel' is his greatest achievement.
It is called Absalom and Achitophel. To understand it we must know and understand the history of the times.
In spite of the fine sounding lines you will perhaps never care to read Absalom and Achitophel save as a footnote to history.
Devil's willful challenge of God's absolutism, Achitophel
Which British poet and critic wrote the play All for Love and the verse satire Absalom and Achitophel? A EM Forster B John Dryden C HG Wells D Joseph Conrad 4.
In much of the literature of the period, parallels are drawn between contemporary individuals or events and those of the past, sustaining a temporal formation grounded in typology, as is perhaps best seen in Dryden's Absalom and Achitophel (1681).
In perhaps the most famous literary evocation of Monmouth's story, John Dryden's Absalom and Achitophel (1681), Monmouth's illegitimacy and rebellion are treated sympathetically but ultimately condemned.
their bounds divide," said John Dryden in Absalom and Achitophel.
In ancient times, Jews condemned suicide, hence in the Bible, the Old Testament recounts only four cases of suicide, committed in circumstances related more or less to war situations (Samson, King Saul and his servant, Achitophel).