hydrogen chloride

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hydrogen chloride

n.
A colorless, pungent gas, HCl, that forms hydrochloric acid when dissolved in water, and is used in the manufacture of plastics.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hydrogen chloride

n
1. (Elements & Compounds) a colourless pungent corrosive gas obtained by the action of sulphuric acid on sodium chloride: used in making vinyl chloride and other organic chemicals. Formula: HCl
2. (Elements & Compounds) an aqueous solution of hydrogen chloride; hydrochloric acid
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hy′drogen chlo′ride


n.
a colorless gas, HCl, having a pungent odor: the anhydride of hydrochloric acid.
[1865–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

hydrogen chloride

A colorless, corrosive, suffocating gas, HCl, used in making plastics and in many industrial processes. When mixed with water, it forms hydrochloric acid.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hydrogen chloride - a colorless corrosive gas (HCl)
acid - any of various water-soluble compounds having a sour taste and capable of turning litmus red and reacting with a base to form a salt
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

hydrogen chloride

nacido cloridrico
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
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