acorn

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a·corn

 (ā′kôrn′, ā′kərn)
n.
The fruit of an oak, consisting of a single-seeded, thick-walled nut set in a woody, cuplike base.

[Middle English akorn, from Old English æcern.]
Word History: A thoughtful glance at the word acorn might produce the surmise that it is made up of oak (from Old English āc) and corn, especially if we think of corn in its sense of "a kernel or seed of a plant," as in peppercorn. The fact that others thought the word was so constituted partly accounts for the present form acorn. Here we see the workings of the process of linguistic change known as folk etymology, an alteration in form of a word or phrase so that it resembles a more familiar term mistakenly regarded as analogous. Acorn actually goes back to Old English æcern, "acorn," which in turn goes back to the Indo-European root *ōg-, meaning "fruit, berry."
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

acorn

(ˈeɪkɔːn)
n
(Botany) the fruit of an oak tree, consisting of a smooth thick-walled nut in a woody scaly cuplike base
[C16: a variant (through influence of corn) of Old English æcern the fruit of a tree, acorn; related to Gothic akran fruit, yield]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•corn

(ˈeɪ kɔrn, ˈeɪ kərn)

n.
the typically ovoid fruit or nut of an oak, enclosed at the base by a cupule.
[before 1000; Middle English acorne (influenced by corn1), akern, Old English æcern, æcren mast, c. Middle High German ackeran acorn, Old Norse akarn fruit of wild trees, Gothic akran fruit, yield]
a′corned, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acorn - fruit of the oak tree: a smooth thin-walled nut in a woody cup-shaped baseacorn - fruit of the oak tree: a smooth thin-walled nut in a woody cup-shaped base
acorn cup, cupule - cup-shaped structure of hardened bracts at the base of an acorn
oak tree, oak - a deciduous tree of the genus Quercus; has acorns and lobed leaves; "great oaks grow from little acorns"
fruit - the ripened reproductive body of a seed plant
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
žalud
agern
tammenterhoterho
žir
makk
akarn
どんぐり
도토리
ekollon
ผลต้นโอ๊ก
quả sồi

acorn

[ˈeɪkɔːn] Nbellota f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

acorn

[ˈeɪkɔːrn] ngland m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

acorn

nEichel f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

acorn

[ˈeɪkɔːn] n (Bot) → ghianda
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

acorn

جَوْزَةُ البَلُّوط žalud agern Eichel βελανίδι bellota terho gland žir ghianda どんぐり 도토리 eikel eikenøtt żołądź bolota желудь ekollon ผลต้นโอ๊ก meşe palamudu quả sồi 橡果
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
He says, 'I've shoveled acorns enough in there to keep the family thirty years, and if I can see a sign of one of 'em I wish I may land in a museum with a belly full of sawdust in two minutes!'
The course of meat finished, they spread upon the sheepskins a great heap of parched acorns, and with them they put down a half cheese harder than if it had been made of mortar.
Or is it this: To feed on the acorns and grass of knowledge, and for the sake of truth to suffer hunger of soul?
(acorns) which, in all times, had been gathered in that neighbourhood.
There was a pleasing inequality in the table, which produced many mishaps to cups and plates, acorns dropped in the milk, little black ants partook of the refreshments without being invited, and fuzzy caterpillars swung down from the tree to see what was going on.
The method is this: in an acre of ground you bury, at six inches distance and eight deep, a quantity of acorns, dates, chestnuts, and other mast or vegetables, whereof these animals are fondest; then you drive six hundred or more of them into the field, where, in a few days, they will root up the whole ground in search of their food, and make it fit for sowing, at the same time manuring it with their dung: it is true, upon experiment, they found the charge and trouble very great, and they had little or no crop.
I saw her first, gathering young acorns from the branches of a large oak near our tree.
To hear acorns at their summit, and bees I the middle; And the sheep the bowed down bowed the with the their fleeces.
"Food, however, became scarce, and I often spent the whole day searching in vain for a few acorns to assuage the pangs of hunger.
"Begone to your sty!" cried the enchantress, giving them some smart strokes with her wand; and then she turned to the serving men--"Drive out these swine, and throw down some acorns for them to eat."
The master of the week being short-sighted, and the prepostors of the week small and not well up to their work, the lower- school boys employ the ten minutes which elapse before their names are called in pelting one another vigorously with acorns, which fly about in all directions.
The curse of St Withold upon these infernal porkers!'' said the swine-herd, after blowing his horn obstreperously, to collect together the scattered herd of swine, which, answering his call with notes equally melodious, made, however, no haste to remove themselves from the luxurious banquet of beech-mast and acorns on which they had fattened, or to forsake the marshy banks of the rivulet, where several of them, half plunged in mud, lay stretched at their ease, altogether regardless of the voice of their keeper.