adaptive immune system

(redirected from Acquired immune response)
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adaptive immune system

n.
The component of the vertebrate immune system involving lymphocytes (B cells and T cells) containing a small number of proteins that combine to produce an enormous variety of distinct proteins capable of recognizing and deactivating specific antigens. It is one of two main components of the immune system, along with the innate immune system.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Importantly, inhibition of MASP-2 does not appear to interfere with the antibody-dependent classical complement activation pathway, which is a critical component of the acquired immune response to infection, and its abnormal function is associated with a wide range of autoimmune disorders.
One aspect that hens and mammals have in common, is the presence of both, the innate as well as the acquired immune response. These animal groups possess immune cells and molecules.
Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) has become a leading cause of severe fungal infections in critically ill patients and has a high mortality rate, especially in patients with immune dysfunction such as those undergoing immunosuppressive or high-dose glucocorticoid therapy, and solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients.[sup][1] The acquired immune response is mediated by T-lymphocytes, which determine whether the host can effectively clear the pathogen.
The type of APC, the receptor activated and the site of the cell when it encounters a pathogen may have a strong effect on the strength, quality and persistence of the subsequent acquired immune response. This has significant implications for vaccine development.
It should be noted, however, that, for fish species adapted to colder temperatures, increasing the temperature does not improve the acquired immune response. Thus, current data indicate that immunoglobulin production is indeed affected by water temperature but that each fish species has a temperature range at which the acquired immune response might be optimal.
Activated macrophages contribute to pathogen clearance and activation of lymphocytes, in an attempt to stimulate the generation of an acquired immune response capable of improving parasite removal and fighting a secondary infection [2, 43].
These two compounds do not enhance the vaccine itself; instead, they help boost the immune system's acquired immune response, giving your body the tools it needs to effectively utilize the vaccine.
To investigate the contribution of an acquired immune response in the formation of osteolytic lesion, the periodontal pathogen Pg was injected adjacent to calvarial bone with or without prior immunization against Pg.
Such acquired immune response have become so common that it is uncommon to meet someone able to reply upon their dendritic cells for defense and repair functions without calling for antibody or T-cell lymphocyte backup.
An acquired immune response is activated by a specific foreign particle called an antigen.
The biochemical regulating cytokines, in the words of editors House (DynPort Vaccine Company, US) and Descotes (Poison Center and Pharmacovigilance Unit, Lyon Cedex, France), "facilitate the initial recognition of foreignness that launches innate host defenses, they form the bridge that allows a nonspecific response to mature into an antigen-specific acquired immune response, and they maintain this response for the life of the individual." In recognition of this importance of cytokines to the field of immunotoxicology, they present 16 chapters reviewing aspects of how modulation of cytokines can affect human health.

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