acquirer

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Related to Acquiring Company: Hostile bid

ac·quire

 (ə-kwīr′)
tr.v. ac·quired, ac·quir·ing, ac·quires
1. To gain possession of: acquire 100 shares of stock.
2. To get by one's own efforts: acquire proficiency in math.
3. To gain through experience; come by: acquired a growing dislike of television sitcoms.
4. To locate (a target) with an aiming device or a tracking system, such as radar.

[Middle English acquere, from Old French aquerre, from Latin acquīrere, to add to : ad-, ad- + quaerere, to seek, get.]

ac·quir′a·ble adj.
ac·quir′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acquirer - a person who acquires something (usually permanently)acquirer - a person who acquires something (usually permanently)
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
recipient, receiver - a person who receives something
appropriator - someone who takes for his or her own use (especially without permission)
securer, procurer - someone who obtains or acquires; "the procurer of opera tickets"
2.acquirer - a corporation gaining financial control over another corporation or financial institution through a payment in cash or an exchange of stockacquirer - a corporation gaining financial control over another corporation or financial institution through a payment in cash or an exchange of stock
banking company, banking concern, depository financial institution, bank - a financial institution that accepts deposits and channels the money into lending activities; "he cashed a check at the bank"; "that bank holds the mortgage on my home"
3.acquirer - the financial institution that dispenses cash in automated teller machines and collects a fee from the bank that issued the credit cardacquirer - the financial institution that dispenses cash in automated teller machines and collects a fee from the bank that issued the credit card
financial institution, financial organisation, financial organization - an institution (public or private) that collects funds (from the public or other institutions) and invests them in financial assets
4.acquirer - a credit card processing bankacquirer - a credit card processing bank; merchants receive credit for credit card receipts less a processing fee
banking company, banking concern, depository financial institution, bank - a financial institution that accepts deposits and channels the money into lending activities; "he cashed a check at the bank"; "that bank holds the mortgage on my home"
Translations

acquirer

[əˈkwaɪərəʳ] N (Comm, Fin) → adquirente mf

acquirer

[əˈkwaɪərər] n (COMMERCE) [company] → acquéreur m

acquirer

n (Fin) → Erwerber(in) m(f)
References in periodicals archive ?
The Acquiring Company holds all the shares in the share capital of the Acquired Company as a consequence of which it shall not be necessary to increase the share capital of ORLEN Upstream upon the moment of merger.
The standard practice pattern only applies if the acquiring company is making one type of acquisition .
Thus, the career fate of the acquired company's managers is under their own control rather than the control of their acquiring company.
It is a scenario that plays out on a regular basis across the country, where all too often, no one in an acquiring company even thinks about the insurance policy until the deal is nearly closed.
For one, the risk manager of the acquiring company must consider the composition of the surviving entity: Is it an asset purchase or a stock purchase?
Here, the acquiring company creates a transitory subsidiary that is "merged with and into" the target company, with the target company surviving after the merger close.
By keeping the longer tenured executives, the acquiring company symbolizes that it values the leadership and prior strategies of the acquired company and that it wants to ensure stability during the transition (Schweiger, Ivancevich & Power, 1987; Pfeffer, 1981; cf.
The reasoning behind the change is that most of the assets and liabilities of an acquisition, including goodwill, become so integrated with the acquiring company that they are indistinguishable from the company's other assets and liabilities.
Because the acquiring company and the controlled subsidiary are members of the controlling corporation's group, the controlling corporation will be treated as directly holding the acquiring company's businesses and assets; because the acquiring company will continue the acquired corporation's historic business following the merger, the transaction will satisfy the COBE requirement.
If senior people alone are making the decisions, or if only people from the acquiring company are consulted, the level of commitment is bound to be low.
But for full integration, you will operate successfully only if you have one corporate culture--ultimately, that of the acquiring company.