reed warbler

(redirected from Acrocephalus scirpaceus)

reed warbler

n
(Animals) any of various common Old World warblers of the genus Acrocephalus, esp A. scirpaceus, that inhabit marshy regions and have a brown plumage
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Translations

reed warbler

nRohrsänger m
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References in periodicals archive ?
Long-term increase in numbers of early-fledged Reed Warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) at Lake Constance (Southern Germany).
Factors affecting haematological variables and body mass of reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) and sedge warblers (A.
Yn ystod y gwanwyn mae bras y cyrs (Emberiza schoeniclus; Reed bunting), telor yr hesg (Acrocephalus schoenobaenus; Sedge warbler) a thelor y cyrs (Acrocephalus scirpaceus; Reed warbler) i'w clywed yma.
Scientists of the Konrad-Lorenz-Institute of Ethology of the Vetmeduni Vienna for the first time tried to experimentally test the behaviour of reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) after a potential act of "cheating" by the female.
A total of 546 captured birds were checked for ticks, and parasites were found on 21 birds from 5 passerine bird species (Phoenicurus phoenicurus, Erythropygia galactotes, Iduna opaca, Acrocephalus scirpaceus, and I.
The timing of post-juvenile moult and fuel deposition in relation to the onset of autumn migration in reed warblers Acrocephalus scirpaceus and sedge warblers Acrocephalus schoenobaenus.
The remaining 6 ticks were delivered by an ornithologist who had removed them from a bird (belonging to the Acrocephalus scirpaceus spp.) that he had captured in the reeds near Pakendorf and Zerbst, Saxony-Anhalt, in May 2007.
The reference collection of marks consisted of imprints in model eggs of the bills of all possible avian predators that occur regularly in or close to our study area: Bittern (Botaurus stellaris), Water Rail (Rallus aquaticus), Marsh Harrier (Circus aeruginosus), Cuckoo (Cuculus canorus), Hooded Crow (Corvus corone cornix), Great Reed Warbler, and Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus scirpaceus).
Breeding ecology of great reed warblers, Acrocephalus arundinaceus and reed warbler Acrocephalus scirpaceus at fish-ponds in SW Poland and lakes in NW Switzerland.
Isolation of Sindbis virus from the reed warbler (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) in Slovakia.
Other species include raptors (Accipiter nisus and Lanius collurio), arboreal insectivores (Dendrocopus major through Phoenicurus phoenicurus), and reed-foraging insectivores (Sylvia communis and Acrocephalus scirpaceus).