acroterion

(redirected from Acroteria)
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acroterion

(ˌækrəʊˈtɪərɪən)
n, pl -ria (-rɪə)
another name for acroterium
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The stone, which stands in the Jewish Philanthropy Cemetery in Bucharest, is tall, with an unconventional top, a "semicircular arch and simplified angled acroteria." Beneath that semicircular arch, two carven hands meet in a warm handshake.
The restoration project has a number of facets ranging from amending earlier restoration mistakes to identifying ancient blocks and placing them correctly on the buildings to making new discoveries in the process such as fragments of a frieze, pediments, evidence concerning acroteria or an old shrine being located in the north peristyle of the Parthenon.
The sarcophagus consists of a box and a roof-shaped lid, which has acroteria on all four corners and pediments (Fig.
Its roots, however, remain classical as may be understood by noting that Smith's Deco ornament typically abstracts classical triglyphs, acroteria, quadrant fans, chevrons, and volutes.
In Greek and Roman times, metals were used almost only honorifically: as decoration in for instance the metal acroteria of some Hellenistic temples, and in the gilded bronze plates of the Pantheon's roof and portico (the latter only finally wrenched off in the early seventeenth century by the the Barberini pope Urban VIII to make Bernini's baldacehino in St Peter's -- hence the comment Quod non fecerunt barbari, fecerunt Barberini).
Bulla Ager Veientanus Aeolus Carians Agriculture (1/2 col + refs Aequi Carthaginians to butchery, farming Agylla (caere) Aesaronenses Celts acroteria Africa, North Chariot Alalia (see Corsica) Agamemnon Cimmmerians Alban hills Aita (Hades) Cippus Albegna valley Ajax (plate ref.) Coins
The architecture and decoration of both halls, especially the terracotta revetments, still surprise by their richness and iconographic elaboration, not least the 'cowboy' acroteria. The text of the book is brief but is buttressed by a full, annotated bibliography of the site.
Chapter Seven treats the pediments and acroteria of the Parthenon.