Act of settlement


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(Eng. Hist.) the statute of 12 and 13 William III, by which the crown was limited to the present reigning house (the house of Hanover).
- Blackstone.

See also: Settlement

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
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1714: Queen Anne, the last Stuart sovereign, died aged 49, to be succeeded by George I under the Act of Settlement of 1701.
1714: Queen Anne, the last Stuart sovereign, died aged 49, to be succeeded by the Elector of Hanover as George I under the Act of Settlement of 1701 - which meant that 55 relatives who under previous rules had a better claim to the throne than George were rejected because they were Roman Catholics.
The 1701 Act of Settlement ensured that the English and Irish crowns would only pass on to Protestants.
After the Glorious Revolution of 1688 when Britain became a constitutional monarchy with a Bill of Rights limiting arbitrary rule by divine right, Catholics were forbidden from succeeding to the British throne by the Act of Settlement of 1701 that made express provision for a Protestant succession to the British throne.
The primary Imperial statutes are the Bill of Rights 1688 and the Act of Settlement 1700.
1714: Queen Anne died aged 49, to be succeeded by George I under the Act of Settlement of 1701.
Drawn up in an era of religious strife, the Act of Settlement 1701, which sets out the succession laws, states that only Protestant descendants of Sophia of Hanover, the mother of king George I, can accede to the throne.
Order of succession is determined by the 1689 Bill of Rights and 1701 Act of Settlement. It is fixed and if Prince Charles wanted to step aside Parliament must agree.
Of the 12 monarchs to have ruled the Great Britain and the UK- since the Act of Settlement in 1701 - six have had the name George.
The practice was codified in the 1701 Act of Settlement which brought to an end the bloodletting and rivalry between the Catholic and Protestant wings of the Stuart Dynasty and their battles to attain the throne.
This act of settlement has recently become a topic of conversation due to the many actions filed by federal regulators against banks, underwriters, mortgage lenders and credit rating agencies.