Acts of the Apostles

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Acts of the Apostles

 (ăkts)
pl.n. (used with a sing. verb)
See Table at Bible.

Acts of the Apostles

n
(Bible) the fifth book of the New Testament, describing the development of the early Church from Christ's ascension into heaven to Paul's sojourn at Rome. Often shortened to: Acts

Acts′ of the Apos′tles


n.
a book of the New Testament. Also called Acts.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Acts of the Apostles - a New Testament book describing the development of the early church from Christ's Ascension to Paul's sojourn at RomeActs of the Apostles - a New Testament book describing the development of the early church from Christ's Ascension to Paul's sojourn at Rome
New Testament - the collection of books of the Gospels, Acts of the Apostles, the Pauline and other epistles, and Revelation; composed soon after Christ's death; the second half of the Christian Bible
Translations
Apostelgeschichte
Apostolien teot

Acts of the Apostles

n (Bible) the Acts of the Apostlesgli Atti degli Apostoli
References in classic literature ?
But at a very early time the people of England began to act.
Until the people have, by some solemn and authoritative act, annulled or changed the established form, it is binding upon themselves collectively, as well as individually; and no presumption, or even knowledge, of their sentiments, can warrant their representatives in a departure from it, prior to such an act.
Yet they felt that the true test of any Juliet is the balcony scene of the second act.
She is quite beautiful, Dorian," he said, "but she can't act.
A few moments afterwards the footlights flared up and the curtain rose on the third act.
Again, there is a third case,--act.
You are right, Laurence," said Grandfather, "and it was really amazing and terrible to see what a change came over the aspect of the people the moment the English Parliament had passed this oppressive act.
Grandfather spoke briefly of the public measures that were taken in opposition to the Stamp Act.
Reserving his opinion, Henry turned the page, and devoted himself to the reading of the next act.
He reverts to the events which have happened since the close of the First Act.
As far as the scene of the Countess's soliloquy, the incidents of the Second Act had reflected the events of his late brother's life as faithfully as the incidents of the First Act.
Sergey Ivanovitch, waiting till the malignant gentleman had finished speaking, said that he thought the best solution would be to refer to the act itself, and asked the secretary to find the act.