activated charcoal


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ac·ti·vat·ed charcoal

(ăk′tə-vā′tĭd)
n.
Highly absorbent carbon obtained by heating granulated charcoal to exhaust contained gases, resulting in a very porous form with a large surface area. It is used chiefly for purifying gases by adsorption, solvent recovery, or deodorization and as an antidote to certain poisons. Also called activated carbon.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.activated charcoal - powdered or granular carbon used for purifying by adsorptionactivated charcoal - powdered or granular carbon used for purifying by adsorption; given orally (as a slurry) it is an antidote for some kinds of poisons
atomic number 6, carbon, C - an abundant nonmetallic tetravalent element occurring in three allotropic forms: amorphous carbon and graphite and diamond; occurs in all organic compounds
References in periodicals archive ?
A plastic dosing syringe from your veterinarian helps in administering hydrogen peroxide and activated charcoal, or even to water to a dehydrated dog.
Activated charcoal is a black powder made from coconut shells, coal, bone char or sawdust.
Activated charcoal is used in water filtration, and it is a go-to treatment in many cases of overdose and poisoning.
[UKPRwire, Wed Apr 03 2019] The global activated charcoal market size is expected to reach USD 6.68 billion by 2025.
Capitalizing on the "explosive" growth of its fluoride-free activated charcoal paste, Hello Products has recently added a fluoride variant to its lineup, notes Dubitsky.
[ClickPress, Thu Mar 14 2019] The global activated charcoal market size is expected to reach USD 6.68 billion by 2025.
For instance, the menu at the 28-unit California fresh restaurant chain Lemonade includes a maple activated charcoal lemonade.
Alexander Beer was made the butt of hundreds of jokes onTwitterafter his "pretentious wellness schedule" was shared, including a vigorous regime of exercise, coconut water and "activated charcoal between meetings".
Activated charcoal is excellent for the scalp, helping to fight clogged pores, dirt, and grime that builds on the base of the hair follicle.
Social media activity around avocado, almonds, and quinoa far outstrips that of activated charcoal, collagen, or pea protein, suggesting that consumers are more interested in foods that are easy to understand and naturally healthy, according to a social media analysis by New Nutrition Business.
Next time someone mentions activated charcoal, just say no.
While many 2018 food trends forecasts featured adventurous ingredients such as moringa and activated charcoal, most of them likely won't make it to chain menus.