toxicity

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tox·ic·i·ty

 (tŏk-sĭs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. tox·ic·i·ties
1. The quality or condition of being toxic.
2. The degree to which a substance is toxic.

toxicity

(tɒkˈsɪsɪtɪ)
n
1. the degree of strength of a poison
2. the state or quality of being poisonous

tox•ic•i•ty

(tɒkˈsɪs ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
the quality, relative degree, or specific degree of being toxic or poisonous.
[1880–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.toxicity - the degree to which something is poisonoustoxicity - the degree to which something is poisonous
definite quantity - a specific measure of amount
cytotoxicity - the degree to which something is toxic to living cells
2.toxicity - grave harmfulness or deadlinesstoxicity - grave harmfulness or deadliness  
unwholesomeness, morbidness, morbidity - the quality of being unhealthful and generally bad for you
Translations
myrkyllisyys

toxicity

[ˌtɒkˈsɪsɪtɪ] Ntoxicidad f

toxicity

[tɒkˈsɪsəti] ntoxicité f

toxicity

nGiftigkeit f, → Giftgehalt m

tox·ic·i·ty

n. toxicidad,
cualidad de ser venenoso;
reacción adversa a una medicina.

toxicity

n toxicidad f
References in periodicals archive ?
THURSDAY, July 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Acute exposure to pollutants in the week prior to delivery and day of delivery is associated with increased odds of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission, according to a study published online July 12 in the Annals of Epidemiology.
Chlorpyrifos acute exposure induces hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in rats.
The research concluded that acute exposure to flavored e-liquids or e-cigarettes worsens endothelial dysfunction, which often precedes cardiovascular diseases.
Acute exposure to high concentrations may affect the central nervous system, as well as cause liver and kidney damage [2,3].
According to the advocacy group "Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families" based in US, "at least 64 people have died from acute exposure to MC since 1980."
Typically, this information is provided by experimental data based on the acute exposure of fish for 96 h to the test chemicals according to an internationally agreed testing guideline (OECD, 1992).
Arsenic can have significant carcinogenic effects, including skin, lung and bladder carcinoma, on both chronic and acute exposure.3 It has also been associated with cardiac and neurodevelopmental disorders, as well as new studies associating it with diabetes mellitus.2 Studies assessing the risk of these effects have been carried out in Iran,4 and we believe that similar studies should be conducted to further investigate these effects in Pakistan, in light of the increasing arsenic contamination.
The antibodies will decrease over the next seven to 11 weeks and may be totally gone after four to five months, making this a good indicator of an acute infection, or at least an acute exposure.
These two DOD projects are in addition to the NIH-funded late stage development of PLX-R18 to treat the injuries from acute exposure to high levels of radiation.
'The available guidelines and results in this study indicate that the concentrations of arsenic found in juices have the potential to affect health in case of acute exposure. However, long-term exposure to arsenic in low concentrations may cause disruption in cellular communication, diabetes, vascular and lung diseases and cancer,' the study says.
Individual BLL ranged from nondetectable to 335 [micro]g/dL, with 73% of the samples testing positive for acute exposure to lead.

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