altitude sickness

(redirected from Acute mountain sickness)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.
Related to Acute mountain sickness: acetazolamide, chronic mountain sickness

altitude sickness

n.
A collection of symptoms, including shortness of breath, headache, and nosebleed, brought on by decreased oxygen in the atmosphere, such as that encountered at high altitudes.

altitude sickness

n
(Pathology) another name for mountain sickness

al′titude sick`ness


n.
a disorder associated with the low oxygen content of the atmosphere at high altitudes, in acute conditions resulting in prostration, shortness of breath, and cardiac disturbances.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.altitude sickness - effects (as nosebleed or nausea) of oxygen deficiency in the blood and tissues at high altitudesaltitude sickness - effects (as nosebleed or nausea) of oxygen deficiency in the blood and tissues at high altitudes
hypoxia - oxygen deficiency causing a very strong drive to correct the deficiency
mountain sickness - nausea and shortness of breath experienced by mountain climbers above ten thousand feet
References in periodicals archive ?
* SAUHMA does not recommend the use of mild hyperbaric therapy for any medical purpose other than acute mountain sickness.
[6.] Kayser B, Dumont L, Lysakowski C, et al Reappraisal of acetazolamide for the prevention of acute mountain sickness: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
Rales, peripheral edema, retinal hemorrhage and acute mountain sickness. Am J Med.1979; 67: 214-8.
The incidence, importance, and prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness. Lancet.
Acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE) represent a continuum of one form of such illness.
Previous epidemiological investigations of the relationship between smoking and acute mountain sickness (AMS) risk yielded inconsistent findings.
Baumgartner, "Acute mountain sickness: controversies and advances," High Altitude Medicine and Biology, vol.
In conclusion, here we show for the very first time that evolutionary adaptive changes related to Aymara high-altitude ancestry per se do not confer protection against acute mountain sickness and altitude-induced arterial hypoxemia during rapid exposure to 3500masl.
"I managed to get acute mountain sickness, and had to come down and spend a couple of days sitting in a hotel with an oxygen cylinder.
As you climb higher, you have less oxygen available to breathe, raising the risk of acute mountain sickness and the more serious high-altitude cerebral and pulmonary edema.
Also, it would have been interesting to know if any of the race-walkers from lowHH+NHNight group, who were given exposure to hypoxia of 3000m, reported for acute mountain sickness (AMS) on the morning of day2.

Full browser ?