myocarditis

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my·o·car·di·tis

 (mī′ō-kär-dī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of the myocardium.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

myocarditis

(ˌmaɪəʊkɑːˈdaɪtɪs)
n
(Pathology) inflammation of the heart muscle
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

my•o•car•di•tis

(ˌmaɪ oʊ kɑrˈdaɪ tɪs)

n.
inflammation of the myocardium.
[1865–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

myocarditis

an inflamed condition of the muscular walls of the heart.
See also: Heart
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

myocarditis

Inflammation of the myocardium (main heart muscle) that can weaken the heart, impairing its function.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.myocarditis - inflammation of the myocardium (the muscular tissue of the heart)
carditis - inflammation of the heart
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
myokarditida

my·o·car·di·tis

n. miocarditis, infl. del miocardio.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

myocarditis

n miocarditis f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
These viruses, especially group B coxsackieviruses (CV-B), are considered to be a common cause of acute myocarditis in children and young adults.
In April a coroner said Amy suffered from acute myocarditis - an infection of the heart, which had caused a cardiac arrest.
Though more dramatic in its presentation, if managed aggressively with early mechanical support using extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (ECMO), fulminant myocarditis patients may have full recovery and less risk of developing DCM.15 Acute myocarditis follows a less distinct onset, initially with less severe compromise, but may lead to worse outcome than fulminant myocarditis, with the development of DCM.
Acute myocarditis (AMC) is a serious disorder, whereby the clinical course and presentation are highly variable [1, 2].
In this regard, cardiac MRI has been particularly valuable and has also improved diagnostic accuracy substantially for such uncommon conditions as coronary embolization and acute myocarditis (2).
Its application has been extended to several other areas, such as for patients with postoperative cardiogenic shock or cardiogenic shock related to acute myocardical infarction, acute myocarditis, and severe, reversible cardiomyopathy.
Acute myocarditis is characterized by rapid development of life-threatening congestive heart failure and arrhythmias.
Tragic Susan was admitted to the hospital 17 days after giving birth but she died three days later from acute myocarditis.
We describe an elusive case of a young male with recurrent episodes of acute myocarditis presenting with chest pain and elevated troponin T.
In a series of 50 children admitted with cardiac failure over a nine-month period, at the Mayo Hospital Lahore, acute myocarditis was the commonest (n=24; 48 Percent), while DCM was far behind (n=7; 14 Percent).3 In a retrospective analysis of 100 cases (mean age 54 years) of congestive cardiac failure at the Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar, over an eight-month period, cardiomyopathy was reported in 11 (11 Percent) cases.4 In an echocardiographic series of 6620 cases of congestive cardiac failure over a 5-year period at the Punjab Institute of Cardiology, Lahore, out of 2335 cases of acquired heart disease, myocardial disease (myocarditis or DCM) was present in 572 (24 Percent) cases.5
In addition, enteroviruses are well documented as a cause of acute myocarditis, with viruses in the species Human enterovirus B, particularly CBVs, being the most common etiologic agents (2).
There was also a late gadolinium enhancement of the subepicardial lateral wall (Figure 3), thus confirming the diagnosis of acute myocarditis. There was good correlation between DE-MDCT and delayed-enhanced MRI images (DE-MRI).

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