adaw


Also found in: Acronyms.

adaw

(əˈdɔː)
vb
1. (intr) to subdue
2. (intr) to wake up
3. (tr) to awaken
References in periodicals archive ?
153, eventually uses "D" to stand for ADAW, so that he ultimately describes his comprehensive view as D + EAAW.
13) By the early 1990s, Adaw had also taken an interest in the struggle for Indigenous rights.
When Adaw joined (Ab)Original Dancers, he was considerably older than the other dancers, most of whom were in their twenties.
In these annual productions Adaw often played a role in scripting narrative settings for the choreography, as well as in acting as a narrator on stage.
Adaw was the major driving force behind this latter change.
After the completion of Holding Ina's Hand, Adaw became more and more interested in theatre projects.
As Adaw began to conceptualize the style of theatre that he was seeking to create, he was influenced by avant-garde playwright and director Chung Chiao's (Zhong Qiao) [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] Assignment Theatre [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and Kaliwat Theatre Collective from Mindanao in the Philippines, both of which have been interested in "people's theatre" and more flexible, performer-directed expression.
In this production, representatives of Taiwan's Indigenous peoples, including Adaw, were invited to participate.
Another aspect of Kaliwat's performance that Adaw was drawn to was their technique of "collective creation" [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] where the play proceeded without a complete script, relying rather on the spontaneous contributions of the actors to drive the action forward.
The experience of working on and performing in Holding Ina's Hand had demonstrated to Adaw new aspects of the process of cultural retrieval and affirmation that Indigenous people had been engaging in for the past decade or so since the founding of the ATA in the 1980s.
37) By grounding his theatre in that spiritual and social order, Adaw could hope to communicate with his people in terms in which they could identify.
As Chen Chih-Fan explains, Adaw saw this latter as the second great flood, and it presented a profound change in the history of the people of Tapalong: "Adaw indicates that in Amis mythology during the first 'Great Flood' the heavenly gods sent the many spirits down to earth to 'become human beings.