pernicious anemia

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pernicious anemia

n.
A severe anemia most often affecting older adults, caused by failure of the stomach to absorb vitamin B12 and marked by a decrease in number and an increase in the size of red blood cells, by gastrointestinal disturbances, and by lesions of the spinal cord.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

perni′cious ane′mia


n.
a severe anemia associated with inadequate intake or absorption of vitamin B12, characterized by defective production of red blood cells.
[1870–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

pernicious anemia

Anemia is the lack of hemoglobin (oxygen- carrying part of blood). Pernicious anemia is due to a lack of vitamin B12, and is often caused by an autoimmune disorder.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pernicious anemia - a chronic progressive anemia of older adults; thought to result from a lack of intrinsic factor (a substance secreted by the stomach that is responsible for the absorption of vitamin B12)
megaloblastic anaemia, megaloblastic anemia - anemia characterized by many large immature and dysfunctional red blood cells (megaloblasts) in the bone marrow; associated with pernicious anemia
metaplastic anaemia, metaplastic anemia - pernicious anemia in which the various formed elements in the blood are changed
anemia, anaemia - a deficiency of red blood cells
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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The patient suffered from type 2 diabetes (he takes human insulin: 22 units before breakfast and 14 before dinner), hypertension (he takes 80 mg of valsartan in the morning, 1.5 mg of indapamide in the morning), chronic stable coronary disease (the patient takes 5 mg of bisoprolol fumarate in the morning), hyperlipidemia (he takes 20 mg of rosuvastatin at night), Addison-Biermer disease (untreated) and multinodular goitre in euthyreosis.