adhocracy


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adhocracy

(ædˈhɒkrəsɪ)
n
management that responds to urgent problems rather than planning to avoid them
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adhocracy - an organization with little or no structure; "the choice between bureaucracy and adhocracy represents a common dilemma"; "the need for informational flexibility can lead to adhocracy"
organization, organisation - a group of people who work together
Translations

adhocracy

n no plVertrauen ntauf Ad-hoc-Entscheidungen; (= organization)Adhokratie f
References in periodicals archive ?
adhocracy: An organization with little structure that's run by creating a series of temporary cross-functional teams to do specific tasks.
The ranking of organization culture types from the highest to the lowest impact on job satisfaction is clan adhocracy market and hierarchy cultures (Lund 2003).
These two dimensions together form four quadrants, each representing a distinct set of organizational culture: clan, adhocracy, market, and hierarchy.
As a result they developed their famous competing values framework that classifies organizational culture into four types: clan, adhocracy, market, and hierarchy, as presented in Figure 1.
The relationship between organizational culture and LMX quality was analysed and in Firm A, a significant relationship between all cultural profiles (clan, hierarchy, adhocracy, market) and LMX quality was found.
The committee structure was reworked with a greater emphasis on adhocracy. In our mission there is a greater emphasis on a safe work environment rather than the traditional economic and general welfare clause which really focused on collective bargaining which ANA is no longer involved in.
Paul Bremer, the chief administrator of the Coalition Provisional Authority, is criticised for ignoring advice and presiding over an "adhocracy" in which there was little planning and decisions were frequently poor.
* They practice what Resilience calls "adhocracy," which is characterized by "informal team roles, limited focus on standard operating procedures, deep improvisation, rapid cycles, selective decentralization, the empowerment of special teams, and a general intolerance of bureaucracy."
This has resulted in a number of organizational typologies (Galan et al., 2012) from the multidivisional structure (Chandler, 1962), to the adhocracy (Mintzberg, 1979), to the radical, and very unstable spaghetti organization (Foss, 2003).
A negative aspect of an adhocracy is that the team member's knowledge is generally tacit and may leave the organization when they do.
This follows the ideas of Feller (2002), who advocated for the management styles characterized by adhocracy, a dynamic, flexible organizational form that shuns hierarchical control (p.