Adi Granth


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Adi Granth

(ˌaːdɪ ˈɡrʌnt)
n
(Other Non-Christian Religious Writings) another name for Guru Granth
[from Punjabi: first book]

Adi Granth

Sikh sacred book.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Adi Granth - the principal sacred text of Sikhism contains hymns and poetry as well as the teachings of the first five gurusAdi Granth - the principal sacred text of Sikhism contains hymns and poetry as well as the teachings of the first five gurus
Sikhism - the doctrines of a monotheistic religion founded in northern India in the 16th century by Guru Nanak and combining elements of Hinduism and Islam
References in periodicals archive ?
In the same century fifth Guru Arjun sahib compiled the Adi Granth, the holy book of Sikh religion.
Adi Granth is the principal sacred scripture of which religion?
This festival also marks conversion of Adi Granth into Guru Granth Sahib and finalizing many other elements of Sikh religion.
The fifth Guru, Guru Arjan, put together the complete set of writings of the Gurus in the form of the Adi Granth. In the Adi Granth, Guru Arjan also included the spiritual verses of individuals from different social, faith and cultural backgrounds, thereby firmly entrenching within Sikh ideology and practice Guru Nanak's philosophy of the universality of humanity.
A wonderful example of such a creation could be quoted as the monumental Adi Granth, now known as great and revered Guru Granth Sahib in which the best devotional songs and hyms of various over thirty splendid religious poets such as Kabir, Farid, Namdev, Ramdas of the medieval period have been integrally enshrined in the narrative of the Granth.
In this vein the Sikh Gurus often ask us to apply the antimony of the Name of God to the eyes so that we may see the divine present everywhere (for example, Guru Arjan's Bavan Akhri gauri 22, Adi Granth, p.
Rising serenely from the centre of the pool, glimmering in the intense sunlight, is the mesmerically beautiful, gold-encrusted, bulbous-domed Harmandir, the three-storey 'Golden Temple of God' built by Arjan Dev to house the Sikh holy book, the Adi Granth.
Guru Teg Bahadur, the ninth Master says in the Adi Granth that God resides in each heart.
The Adi Granth is the first sacred book of the Sikhs, compiled by their fifth guru, Arjan (1563-1606, guru from 1581).
Their sacred scriptures, compiled by the fifth guru, Arjun, are known as the Adi Granth.
That is the shrine of Guru Arjan, the fifth Guru of Sikhs and the first martyr, who built the Harmander Sahib, founded Tarn Taran Sahib city, compiled the text Adi Granth, founded Kartarpur and Jalandhar city, and wrote Sukhmani Sahib.
In 2000 Pashavra Singh, in an important work of scholarship, The Guru Grant Sahib: Canon, Meaning and Authority (New Delhi: Oxford University Press), provided an overview of many of the most central issues involved in the text criticism of the most sacred work of Sikh scripture, the Adi Granth (known to pious members of the Sikh community as the Adi Sri Guru Granth Sahib).