Adi Granth


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Adi Granth

(ˌaːdɪ ˈɡrʌnt)
n
(Other Non-Christian Religious Writings) another name for Guru Granth
[from Punjabi: first book]

Adi Granth

Sikh sacred book.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Adi Granth - the principal sacred text of Sikhism contains hymns and poetry as well as the teachings of the first five gurusAdi Granth - the principal sacred text of Sikhism contains hymns and poetry as well as the teachings of the first five gurus
Sikhism - the doctrines of a monotheistic religion founded in northern India in the 16th century by Guru Nanak and combining elements of Hinduism and Islam
References in periodicals archive ?
That is the shrine of Guru Arjan, the fifth Guru of Sikhs and the first martyr, who built the Harmander Sahib, founded Tarn Taran Sahib city, compiled the text Adi Granth, founded Kartarpur and Jalandhar city, and wrote Sukhmani Sahib.
In this vein the Sikh Gurus often ask us to apply the antimony of the Name of God to the eyes so that we may see the divine present everywhere (for example, Guru Arjan's Bavan Akhri gauri 22, Adi Granth, p.
Rising serenely from the centre of the pool, glimmering in the intense sunlight, is the mesmerically beautiful, gold-encrusted, bulbous-domed Harmandir, the three-storey 'Golden Temple of God' built by Arjan Dev to house the Sikh holy book, the Adi Granth.
Guru Teg Bahadur, the ninth Master says in the Adi Granth that God resides in each heart.
11) Here the delicate question of grace arises, which in Sikhism man cannot trigger by his conduct or actions: therein lies a fundamental difference between Sikhism and Sufism, aptly illustrated by the dialogue in the Adi Granth between Shaik Farid and the Sikh gurus who have written commentaries on his poetry.
Their sacred scriptures, compiled by the fifth guru, Arjun, are known as the Adi Granth.
In 2000 Pashavra Singh, in an important work of scholarship, The Guru Grant Sahib: Canon, Meaning and Authority (New Delhi: Oxford University Press), provided an overview of many of the most central issues involved in the text criticism of the most sacred work of Sikh scripture, the Adi Granth (known to pious members of the Sikh community as the Adi Sri Guru Granth Sahib).
The fifth Guru says in the Adi Granth that when you are completely alone, your mother, your father, your son, your brother or your friends, no one is near you, God is with you all along the way.
The third Guru writes in the Adi Granth, 'They are not truly wedded whose two bodies merely came together.
Mann describes the purpose of the book in the opening chapter: "In this volume, I argue that traditional reconstruction of the historical formation of the Adi Granth should be extended to both ends from the period of Guru Arjan--back to Guru Nanak and forward almost to the present day--before we have a comprehensive picture of the text's history" (p.
Philological analysis of the Adi Granth (AG), the most sacred work of scripture of the Sikh faith (by whose pious adherents it is referred to by the title Adi Sri Guru Granth Sahib), is both as poorly developed and as controversial as that of the scripture of any South Asian religious tradition.
The most sacred work of Sikh scripture, the Adi Granth (AG) (or Sri Guru Granth Sahib), redacted by the fifth Sikh guru, Arjan, in 1604, in addition to containing verse composed by the first five of the Sikh gurus, also includes a substantial body of poetry by earlier poet saints whose beliefs were felt to be doctrinally compatible with those of the Sikh gurus.