adiaphorism

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adiaphorism

(ˌædɪˈæfəˌrɪzəm)
n
(Theology) a Christian Protestant theological theory that certain rites and actions are matters of indifference in religion since not forbidden by the Scriptures
[C19: see adiaphorous]
ˌadiˈaphorist n
ˌadiˌaphoˈristic adj

adiaphorism

a tolerance of conduct or beliefs not specifically forbidden in the Scriptures. Cf. Flacianism, Philippism. — adiaphorist, n. — adiaphoristic, adj.
See also: Protestantism
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(8) In discussing the varieties of autonomy (e.g., self-control, power in the world, psychological independence, having moral rights, authenticity), Nomy Arpaly thinks that Stoic ataraxia is best understood as a kind of "heroic autonomy," since ideally only the Stoic sage would exhibit the capacity to act such that externals or indifferents (adiaphora) (e.g., wealth, fame, education) exercise no influence, though some indifferents are preferred (e.g., health) while others are not (e.g., poverty); see Nomy Arpaly, Unprincipled Virtue: An Inquiry into Moral Agency (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003), p.
No campo adversario, partidarios da supremacia real, separavam dissencao teologica e dissencao politica, propondo esquemas de compreensao e tolerancia religiosa, baseados na antiga nocao de que na ambito da pratica e doutrina crista havia muitas "coisas indiferentes" (adiaphora), nao prescritas por Cristo como necessarias a salvacao.
This is not adiaphora, and that is why the "young, restless, and reformed" have identified complementarianism as a decisive factor in their theological priorities.
(70) Se trata del ambito de materias que la tradicion ha denominado <<cosas indiferentes>> (adiaphora), y que la autoridad impone como obligatorias cuando busca evitar un mal, cuando quiere alcanzar el bien de la republica o cuando intenta la felicidad comun.
De acuerdo con los estoicos, la derrota no es una desgracia, es un indiferente (adiaphora) para la consecucion de la felicidad, pues no nos lleva en verdad a la infelicidad, lo unico que si nos llevaria a esta es el actuar viciosamente, contra la naturaleza.
Jacqueline Rose's essay on adiaphora (matters indifferent to worship) and debates over authority sheds light on aspects related to tolerationism and religious coexistence that are often overlooked.
Discussions of continuity and change in the church's tradition have focused almost exclusively on what can change and what cannot change, on what is essential and what is adiaphora or accidental.
Indeed, the reformer not only expounds upon the necessity of human delight in the goodness of God, (39) but also offers extended reflection on the freedom of human conscience from things adiaphora, things "indifferent," that bear no relation to the soul or its salvation.
And the Bushop shal confirme them on this wyse." (9) Lutherans, on the other hand, could find no scriptural warrant for the rite of confirmation, so it was quickly relegated to the category of adiaphora. Even so, Martin Luther himself eventually gave an admittedly half-hearted endorsement of the rite: "Confirmation should not be observed as the bishops desire it.
of Leeds, UK) and Donskis (politics, Vytautas Magnus U., Lithuania) examine the rise of what they call "adiaphora," a moral blindness where certain acts and even categories of human beings are placed outside of ethical and moral considerations.
The strong sense of adiaphora, which Braaten does apply to certain well-considered conclusions, is allowed no place in relation to the litmus test issues to which he reacts so strongly.