adiaphorism


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adiaphorism

(ˌædɪˈæfəˌrɪzəm)
n
(Theology) a Christian Protestant theological theory that certain rites and actions are matters of indifference in religion since not forbidden by the Scriptures
[C19: see adiaphorous]
ˌadiˈaphorist n
ˌadiˌaphoˈristic adj

adiaphorism

a tolerance of conduct or beliefs not specifically forbidden in the Scriptures. Cf. Flacianism, Philippism. — adiaphorist, n. — adiaphoristic, adj.
See also: Protestantism
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A reservation: I cannot agree that "the Thirty-Nine Articles did not clinch the victory for the English reformation" (143); their openings to Lutheran adiaphorism and predestinarian moderation perhaps meant that they failed to clinch the victory for anti-Arminian Reformed theology, but the Protestantism of the Articles was uncompromising.
Such adiaphorism may be relatively insignificant in a pure, escapist adventure or fantasy story; but in an allegorical quest such an absence--especially one that insists on raising fundamental ontologic and teleologic questions--has far-reaching implications.
From an April 2005 conference at Duke University, the fourth in a triennial series on early modern German thought, 10 papers look at such topics as the role of adiaphorism in early modern Protestantism, editing Italian music for Lutheran Germany, God's plan for the Swiss Confederation, and the provocation of the void for Baroque culture.